Self Reported Experience of HIV Patients in a Telephone-Delivered Medication Adherence Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147590
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self Reported Experience of HIV Patients in a Telephone-Delivered Medication Adherence Intervention
Abstract:
Self Reported Experience of HIV Patients in a Telephone-Delivered Medication Adherence Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Erlen, Judith A., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Melissa B. Evans, Melissa L. Knox and Lisa Tamres, MS
[Scientific Session Presentation] Important information is obtained by evaluating participants? experience in clinical trials.  This information is useful for investigators to improve the quality of research and of interventions.  This study examines the experience of 178 participants who completed a NIH funded clinical trial (R01 NR04749) who were randomized to receive either adherence counseling or usual care. Intervention participants completed twelve weeks of a telephone-delivered nurse counseling intervention and remained in the study for an additional fifteen months of follow-up. All participants were monitored for adherence using medication pill bottles with electronic event monitors (EEMs), paper and pencil diaries, and several self-report questionnaires. An exit interview occurred at the study?s conclusion. Two raters evaluated the exit interviews to assess participants? satisfaction with the study, and their perception of study benefits. Ratings were compared and disagreements between the two raters were reconciled by a third rater. Preliminary results show that the majority (83%) of all participants commented positively on the study.  Positive comments related to the intervention providing functional and emotional support, such as improving schedules, setting goals, proper medication dosing, and social contact.  Negative comments included burden of study questionnaires, intervention scheduling, perceived redundancy of study measures, and use of the pill bottles with EEMs.  Overall, 47% identified a benefit of improved adherence in response to an open-ended question on study benefits.  Notably, usual care participants reported this perceived adherence improvement as often or more than the intervention participants (51% vs 48%). These findings suggest that study participation may have been perceived as an intervention even by the usual care group. Participant experience might be improved by limiting burden and better technology for monitoring medication adherence. Limitations to the current study include the lack of assessment of study dropouts? perceptions, and the length of time from the intervention to the exit assessment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf Reported Experience of HIV Patients in a Telephone-Delivered Medication Adherence Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147590-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self Reported Experience of HIV Patients in a Telephone-Delivered Medication Adherence Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Erlen, Judith A., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jae001+@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Melissa B. Evans, Melissa L. Knox and Lisa Tamres, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Important information is obtained by evaluating participants? experience in clinical trials.&nbsp; This information is useful for investigators to improve the quality of research and of interventions. &nbsp;This study examines the experience of 178 participants who completed a NIH funded clinical trial (R01 NR04749) who were randomized to receive either adherence counseling or usual care. Intervention participants completed twelve weeks of a telephone-delivered nurse counseling intervention and remained in the study for an additional fifteen months of follow-up. All participants were monitored for adherence using medication pill bottles with electronic event monitors (EEMs), paper and pencil diaries, and several self-report questionnaires. An exit interview occurred at the study?s conclusion. Two raters evaluated the exit interviews to assess participants? satisfaction with the study, and their perception of study benefits. Ratings were compared and disagreements between the two raters were reconciled by a third rater. Preliminary results show that the majority (83%) of all participants commented positively on the study.&nbsp; Positive comments related to the intervention providing functional and emotional support, such as improving schedules, setting goals, proper medication dosing, and social contact.&nbsp; Negative comments included burden of study questionnaires, intervention scheduling, perceived redundancy of study measures, and use of the pill bottles with EEMs.&nbsp; Overall, 47% identified a benefit of improved adherence in response to an open-ended question on study benefits.&nbsp; Notably, usual care participants reported this perceived adherence improvement as often or more than the intervention participants (51% vs 48%). These findings suggest that study participation may have been perceived as an intervention even by the usual care group. Participant experience might be improved by limiting burden and better technology for monitoring medication adherence. Limitations to the current study include the lack of assessment of study dropouts? perceptions, and the length of time from the intervention to the exit assessment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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