The Effect of a Rapid Response Team on Cardiopulmonary Arrests Outside Critical Care Areas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147607
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of a Rapid Response Team on Cardiopulmonary Arrests Outside Critical Care Areas
Abstract:
The Effect of a Rapid Response Team on Cardiopulmonary Arrests Outside Critical Care Areas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Hicks, Stacy, RN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Vincent's Birmingham
Title:Registered Nurse
Co-Authors:Shawneen O'Neill Collins, RN; Rebecca Lucado, RN; Eddah Muya, RN
[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Background: To determine the effect of a Rapid Response Team (RRT) on cardiopulmonary arrest outside critical care areas.Methods: A retrospective, before and after study was conducted at a non-teaching, not-for-profit, private hospital. All adult patients admitted to the hospital from September 2002 to August 2007 who experienced a RRT intervention or cardiopulmonary arrest were included. The RRT is comprised of two critical care nurses and a respiratory therapist. A one-year grace period, August 2004-September 2005, was allowed for proper implementation and education.Results: The incidence of cardiopulmonary arrests and the subsequent mortality rates occurring outside critical care areas over the study period were measured. There were 446 RRT activations during the 24-month period. In the 24 months before the RRT began, the mean number of codes was 4.91 (SD 1.95) as compared to 3.87 (SD 2.01) after RRT implementation. Fifty-nine percent of patients who received RRT intervention stayed in their room while 41% transferred to a higher level care. Prior to RRT intervention, the mortality among patients experiencing cardiopulmonary arrest was 46% as compared to 65% in the post intervention phase.Conclusions: The RRT was associated with a statistically significant decrease in rates of cardiopulmonary arrest outside critical areas (p = 0.04).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of a Rapid Response Team on Cardiopulmonary Arrests Outside Critical Care Areasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147607-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of a Rapid Response Team on Cardiopulmonary Arrests Outside Critical Care Areas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hicks, Stacy, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Vincent's Birmingham</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Registered Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shicks1@stv.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Shawneen O'Neill Collins, RN; Rebecca Lucado, RN; Eddah Muya, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Invited Poster or Paper Session] Background: To determine the effect of a Rapid Response Team (RRT) on cardiopulmonary arrest outside critical care areas.Methods: A retrospective, before and after study was conducted at a non-teaching, not-for-profit, private hospital. All adult patients admitted to the hospital from September 2002 to August 2007 who experienced a RRT intervention or cardiopulmonary arrest were included. The RRT is comprised of two critical care nurses and a respiratory therapist. A one-year grace period, August 2004-September 2005, was allowed for proper implementation and education.Results: The incidence of cardiopulmonary arrests and the subsequent mortality rates occurring outside critical care areas over the study period were measured. There were 446 RRT activations during the 24-month period. In the 24 months before the RRT began, the mean number of codes was 4.91 (SD 1.95) as compared to 3.87 (SD 2.01) after RRT implementation. Fifty-nine percent of patients who received RRT intervention stayed in their room while 41% transferred to a higher level care. Prior to RRT intervention, the mortality among patients experiencing cardiopulmonary arrest was 46% as compared to 65% in the post intervention phase.Conclusions: The RRT was associated with a statistically significant decrease in rates of cardiopulmonary arrest outside critical areas (p = 0.04).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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