The Efficacy of Upper Arm Placement of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Utilizing Bedside Ultrasound and Microintroducer Technique

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147610
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Efficacy of Upper Arm Placement of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Utilizing Bedside Ultrasound and Microintroducer Technique
Abstract:
The Efficacy of Upper Arm Placement of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Utilizing Bedside Ultrasound and Microintroducer Technique
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Humphrey, James P., RN, CNS, MSN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Valdosta State University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing/Senior Faculty Mentor
Co-Authors:Inez H. Nichols, RN, MSN, CRNI
[Scientific Session Presentation] The peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is a well-recognized, safe, cost-effective, and less invasive mode for dependable venous access in comparison to other forms of peripheral and central venous access.  PICCs have several advantages, including bedside insertion with use of local anesthesia, a low risk of major hemorrhage, no risk of pneumothorax or hemothorax, and prevention of peripheral vein damage from irritants by delivering medications and infusates into the well hemodiluted vasculature of central circulation. The performance of placing this device is significantly improved by utilizing the microintroducer technique, also known as the Modified Seldinger Technique (MST), coupled with venous ultrasound (US) technology.  To date, there is a scarcity of nursing literature reporting increased success rates of PICC placement, and resulting decreases in complications when these advanced modalities are applied. The purpose of this study was three-fold for analyzing and reporting outcome data specific to upper arm placement of 6-French dual-lumen and triple-lumen, power-injectable PICCs.  These data included the occurrence of mechanical phlebitis, occurrence of infection associated with PICCs that have dwelled in situ, and the placement success rates of PICCs inserted by designated, specialty registered nurses. This study analyzed archival data from a nursing database in one hospital in southern Georgia in which outcome results had been recorded on PICCs placed in situ.  The review and analysis of 500 PICC procedural attempts inserted by designated, specialty nurses using microintroducer technique and ultrasound guidance revealed an overall catheter placement success rate of 94.6%.  This analysis also provided information on the disposition of those catheters actually placed in situ on subjects who remained hospitalized or within the hospital?s rehabilitation facility.  Of the 422 catheters removed, none of these subjects exhibited signs or symptoms of mechanical phlebitis, and one tested positive per laboratory analysis for organisms confirming infection. It is imperative for nurses to conduct research studies that solidify and validate the positive outcomes of advanced modalities for PICC placement, thus promoting this vascular access technology as the gold standard of care.  The findings of this study should serve as a catalyst for future nursing research on the effective advantages of microintroducer technique coupled with portable venous ultrasound at bedside.  It is, therefore, desirable for findings of this study to be disseminated among professional nursing publications and organizations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Efficacy of Upper Arm Placement of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Utilizing Bedside Ultrasound and Microintroducer Techniqueen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147610-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Efficacy of Upper Arm Placement of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Utilizing Bedside Ultrasound and Microintroducer Technique</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Humphrey, James P., RN, CNS, MSN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valdosta State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing/Senior Faculty Mentor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jphumphr@valdosta.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Inez H. Nichols, RN, MSN, CRNI</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] The peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is a well-recognized, safe, cost-effective, and less invasive mode for dependable venous access in comparison to other forms of peripheral and central venous access.&nbsp; PICCs have several advantages, including bedside insertion with use of local anesthesia, a low risk of major hemorrhage, no risk of pneumothorax or hemothorax, and prevention of peripheral vein damage from irritants by delivering medications and infusates into the well hemodiluted vasculature of central circulation. The performance of placing this device is significantly improved by utilizing the microintroducer technique, also known as the Modified Seldinger Technique (MST), coupled with venous ultrasound (US) technology.&nbsp; To date, there is a scarcity of nursing literature reporting increased success rates of PICC placement, and resulting decreases in complications when these advanced modalities are applied. The purpose of this study was three-fold for analyzing and reporting outcome data specific to upper arm placement of 6-French dual-lumen and triple-lumen, power-injectable PICCs.&nbsp; These data included the occurrence of mechanical phlebitis, occurrence of infection associated with PICCs that have dwelled in situ, and the placement success rates of PICCs inserted by designated, specialty registered nurses. This study analyzed archival data from a nursing database in one hospital in southern Georgia in which outcome results had been recorded on PICCs placed in situ.&nbsp; The review and analysis of 500 PICC procedural attempts inserted by designated, specialty nurses using microintroducer technique and ultrasound guidance revealed an overall catheter placement success rate of 94.6%.&nbsp; This analysis also provided information on the disposition of those catheters actually placed in situ on subjects who remained hospitalized or within the hospital?s rehabilitation facility.&nbsp; Of the 422 catheters removed, none of these subjects exhibited signs or symptoms of mechanical phlebitis, and one tested positive per laboratory analysis for organisms confirming infection. It is imperative for nurses to conduct research studies that solidify and validate the positive outcomes of advanced modalities for PICC placement, thus promoting this vascular access technology as the gold standard of care.&nbsp; The findings of this study should serve as a catalyst for future nursing research on the effective advantages of microintroducer technique coupled with portable venous ultrasound at bedside.&nbsp; It is, therefore, desirable for findings of this study to be disseminated among professional nursing publications and organizations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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