2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147612
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of Pediatric Patient Entanglement in Medical Lines
Abstract:
Prevalence of Pediatric Patient Entanglement in Medical Lines
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Janiszewski Goodin, Heather I., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Capital University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Joyce Mullet, RN; Nancy Ryan-Wenger, PhD, RN, FAAN
[Clinical Session Presentation] Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in children. Children admitted to the hospital are at risk for unintentional injuries from entanglement and possible strangulation from intravenous (IV) lines and lines from other medical equipment. Registered nurses and other health care professionals have anecdotally reported ?near misses? of patient injury due to entanglement from indwelling lines such as IVs or feeding tubes and medical equipment such as oxygen tubing or monitor wires. Further, the actual number of injuries or deaths related to line entanglement is not known. The purpose of this presentation is to investigate the prevalence of medical line use and line entanglement in children at one large, Midwestern pediatric hospital. Over a three-month period, data were collected on in-patient pediatric patients (n = 500) regarding the presence of medical lines, incidence of  line kinking, occlusion, and entanglement with children?s body parts and/or with other lines. Approximately, 75% of children (ages 3 to 36 months) admitted have at least one medical line and are at risk for pulling out lines, entanglement, and strangulation. Preliminary data supports the need for the development of   solutions to improve patient safety regarding the use of medical lines. The strengths and limitations of potential nursing interventions to prevent line entanglement will be discussed. The intended target audience includes registered nurses, nursing students, and health professionals who provide direct patient care to hospitalized children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of Pediatric Patient Entanglement in Medical Linesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147612-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prevalence of Pediatric Patient Entanglement in Medical Lines</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Janiszewski Goodin, Heather I., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Capital University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hjanisze@capital.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joyce Mullet, RN; Nancy Ryan-Wenger, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical Session Presentation] Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death in children. Children admitted to the hospital are at risk for unintentional injuries from entanglement and possible strangulation from intravenous (IV) lines and lines from other medical equipment. Registered nurses and other health care professionals have anecdotally reported ?near misses? of patient injury due to entanglement from indwelling lines such as IVs or feeding tubes and medical equipment such as oxygen tubing or monitor wires. Further, the actual number of injuries or deaths related to line entanglement is not known. The purpose of this presentation is to investigate the prevalence of medical line use and line entanglement in children at one large, Midwestern pediatric hospital. Over a three-month period, data were collected on in-patient pediatric patients (n = 500) regarding the presence of medical lines, incidence of&nbsp; line kinking, occlusion, and entanglement with children?s body parts and/or with other lines. Approximately, 75% of children (ages 3 to 36 months) admitted have at least one medical line and are at risk for pulling out lines, entanglement, and strangulation. Preliminary data supports the need for the development of&nbsp; &nbsp;solutions to improve patient safety regarding the use of medical lines. The strengths and limitations of potential nursing interventions to prevent line entanglement will be discussed. The intended target audience includes registered nurses, nursing students, and health professionals who provide direct patient care to hospitalized children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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