Recruitment and Retention of Rural Low-Income Women into a Culturally Tailored Cognitive Behavioral Intervention in a Local Health Department to Prevent Antepartum Depression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147616
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment and Retention of Rural Low-Income Women into a Culturally Tailored Cognitive Behavioral Intervention in a Local Health Department to Prevent Antepartum Depression
Abstract:
Recruitment and Retention of Rural Low-Income Women into a Culturally Tailored Cognitive Behavioral Intervention in a Local Health Department to Prevent Antepartum Depression
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Jesse, D. Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:East Carolina University
Title:Associate professor and nurse-midwife
[Scientific Session Presentation] Background: Depression during pregnancy is a common and persistent problem resulting in tremendous personal suffering, greater psychosocial and behavioral risks, adverse birth outcomes, and the development of postpartum depression. Design: The pilot study uses a quasi-experimental two-group pre-post design with repeated measures and includes post intervention qualitative interviews. Sample/setting: A convenience sample of 30 African-American and Caucasian rural low-income women enrolled in prenatal clinics in Eastern North Carolina who scored 10 or above on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at the initial screening, spoke English, and met other eligibility criteria. Methods: Insight-Plus, facilitated by mental health professionals, met for 6 weekly 2-hour sessions. Women in the intervention and treatment as usual (TAU) comparison group were interviewed at baseline; 4 weeks post intervention to determine risk of depression in pregnancy, and 4 and 8 weeks postpartum to determine risk for PPD using valid and reliable instruments and qualitative interviews. Results: Recruitment barriers and challenges included level of engagement at interview, scheduling, and maintaining telephone contact. Once enrolled 24 (100%) women who came to the first Insight-Plus session completed all six intervention sessions and 85% (17/20) of the intervention women completed their T3 interview (one-month post intervention); 100% (4/4) of the women in the TAU group completed their T3 interview. From baseline to one month post-intervention (T3) the mean EPDS scores for the intervention group changed from 15.50 (SD 3.15) to 7.25 (4.24, p <.001) while, the mean scores in TAU comparison group changed from 14.00 (SD 4.24) to 11.25 (SD 7.04, NS); at 4 and 8 weeks postpartum the mean EPDS scores were 7.30 (SD 6.52) and 7.3 (SD 6.33, p=<.001 and p<.01) Conclusions: This pilot study was feasible and helpful to low-income women at risk for depression and holds promise for reducing risk of antepartum and postpartum depression.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment and Retention of Rural Low-Income Women into a Culturally Tailored Cognitive Behavioral Intervention in a Local Health Department to Prevent Antepartum Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147616-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruitment and Retention of Rural Low-Income Women into&nbsp;a Culturally Tailored Cognitive Behavioral Intervention in a Local Health Department to Prevent Antepartum Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jesse, D. Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Carolina University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate professor and nurse-midwife</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jessed@ecu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific Session Presentation] Background: Depression during pregnancy is a common and persistent problem resulting in tremendous personal suffering, greater psychosocial and behavioral risks, adverse birth outcomes, and the development of postpartum depression. Design: The pilot study uses a quasi-experimental two-group pre-post design with repeated measures and includes post intervention qualitative interviews. Sample/setting: A convenience sample of 30 African-American and Caucasian rural low-income women enrolled in prenatal clinics in Eastern North Carolina who scored 10 or above on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at the initial screening, spoke English, and met other eligibility criteria. Methods: Insight-Plus, facilitated by mental health professionals, met for 6 weekly 2-hour sessions. Women in the intervention and treatment as usual (TAU) comparison group were interviewed at baseline; 4 weeks post intervention to determine risk of depression in pregnancy, and 4 and 8 weeks postpartum to determine risk for PPD using valid and reliable instruments and qualitative interviews. Results: Recruitment barriers and challenges included level of engagement at interview, scheduling, and maintaining telephone contact. Once enrolled 24 (100%) women who came to the first Insight-Plus session completed all six intervention sessions and 85% (17/20) of the intervention women completed their T3 interview (one-month post intervention); 100% (4/4) of the women in the TAU group completed their T3 interview. From baseline to one month post-intervention (T3) the mean EPDS scores for the intervention group changed from 15.50 (SD 3.15) to 7.25 (4.24, p &lt;.001) while, the mean scores in TAU comparison group changed from 14.00 (SD 4.24) to 11.25 (SD 7.04, NS); at 4 and 8 weeks postpartum the mean EPDS scores were 7.30 (SD 6.52) and 7.3 (SD 6.33, p=&lt;.001 and p&lt;.01) Conclusions: This pilot study was feasible and helpful to low-income women at risk for depression and holds promise for reducing risk of antepartum and postpartum depression.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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