Nicotine Dependence and Hard Core Smokers: Results from the 1999-2002 NHANES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147629
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nicotine Dependence and Hard Core Smokers: Results from the 1999-2002 NHANES
Abstract:
Nicotine Dependence and Hard Core Smokers: Results from the 1999-2002 NHANES
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:McNally, Gretchen A., PhD, CNP
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Title:Nurse Practitioner
[Leadership Session Presentation] Background: Cigarette smoking is recognized globally as the most preventable cause of cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Approximately one half of ever smokers have quit, and nicotine dependence is recognized as a major barrier to quitting. ?Hard core? smokers are described as having increased nicotine dependence and an inability to successfully stop smoking, potentially signifying a significant challenge for tobacco control efforts.Methods:  A secondary data analysis using 1999-2002 National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey data, a cross sectional health survey of a nationally representative sample of the noninstitutionalized U.S. population, was conducted with respondents ages 26 and above reporting  smoking  at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime (n = 4,222). Objectives included characterization of variables associated with smoking status (hard core, non-hard core and former smoker). The relationship between current smokers and nicotine dependence, based on serum cotinine and time to first cigarette was also examined.Results. During 1999-2002, 44% of respondents who smoked were categorized as ?hard core? smokers and were more likely to be of lower socioeconomic status, non-Hispanic white, male and with at least one household member smoking indoors. ?Hard Core? smokers had higher nicotine dependence, with higher serum cotinine levels and smoking their first cigarette within 30 minutes of waking more often.Conclusions. ?Hard core? smokers comprise a significantly large portion of current smokers. Future implications include the development and implementation of tailored smoking cessation interventions for this challenging population. Nurses have the opportunity for significant contributions, impacting local and global nursing communities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNicotine Dependence and Hard Core Smokers: Results from the 1999-2002 NHANESen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147629-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nicotine Dependence and Hard Core Smokers: Results from the 1999-2002 NHANES</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McNally, Gretchen A., PhD, CNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gretchen.mcnally@osumc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Leadership Session Presentation] Background: Cigarette smoking is recognized globally as the most preventable cause of cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Approximately one half of ever smokers have quit, and nicotine dependence is recognized as a major barrier to quitting. ?Hard core? smokers are described as having increased nicotine dependence and an inability to successfully stop smoking, potentially signifying a significant challenge for tobacco control efforts.Methods: &nbsp;A secondary data analysis using 1999-2002 National Health And Nutrition Examination Survey data, a cross sectional health survey of a nationally representative sample of the noninstitutionalized U.S. population, was conducted with respondents ages 26 and above reporting&nbsp; smoking&nbsp; at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime (n = 4,222). Objectives included characterization of variables associated with smoking status (hard core, non-hard core and former smoker). The relationship between current smokers and nicotine dependence, based on serum cotinine and time to first cigarette was also examined.Results. During 1999-2002, 44% of respondents who smoked were categorized as ?hard core? smokers and were more likely to be of lower socioeconomic status, non-Hispanic white, male and with at least one household member smoking indoors. ?Hard Core? smokers had higher nicotine dependence, with higher serum cotinine levels and smoking their first cigarette within 30 minutes of waking more often.Conclusions. ?Hard core? smokers comprise a significantly large portion of current smokers. Future implications include the development and implementation of tailored smoking cessation interventions for this challenging population. Nurses have the opportunity for significant contributions, impacting local and global nursing communities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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