2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147639
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multidisciplinary Approach with Failure to Thrive in Children
Abstract:
Multidisciplinary Approach with Failure to Thrive in Children
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Falkenstein, Kathleen, PhD, PNP
P.I. Institution Name:Drexel University
Title:assistant professor
Co-Authors:Emily Paul, BA; Hans Kerstan, MD; Mariana Chilton, DRPH
[Clinical session research presentation] Failure to thrive (FTT) has a prevalence of between 3% and 10% in both rural and urban populations. FTT is seen as an indicator of physical and psychosocial problems and is associated with subsequent growth delay and cognitive deficiencies. FTT in low income communities can represent the "tip of the iceberg" and many children experience food insecurity which may act as a precursor to FTT. Children with FTT require prompt multidisciplinary management in order to prevent the long term consequences on brain and growth development. The goal of the GROW Clinic is to prevent the long-term health and developmental effects from FTT and its associated family dysfunction. The GROW Clinic is unique in that it employs a multi-disciplinary, team-based approach to child malnutrition that addresses the psychosocial and economic issues of nutrition. Results: Operational since 2005, the clinic has evaluated 146 children/families.100% of the children have weights in less than the 5th percentile at the time of referral (mean age is 18 months). More than 85% of the children at the GROW Clinic have gained an appropriate amount of weight for age (g/d) and have improved behaviors (mealtime structure, juice intake). 20% have been diagnosed with organic FTT (GER, asthma); 92% have psychosocial issues impacting their FTT(unstructured meals, food insecurity, behavior); 96% of patients have excessive fluid intake. One third of the children have developmental delays or behavior issues (ADHD). Social services have been implemented in more than 60% of the families from the GROW Clinic. About 80% of patients have been referred to community organizations (Early Intervention Services; skilled day care providers; DHS). Conclusion: The multidisciplinary approach to FTT implemented by the GROW team has made a major impact on both anthropometric and behavior change in the children/families. The GROW Clinic is working to test the impact of the multidisciplinary approach
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultidisciplinary Approach with Failure to Thrive in Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147639-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multidisciplinary Approach with Failure to Thrive in Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Falkenstein, Kathleen, PhD, PNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Drexel University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">assistant professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kf33@drexel.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Emily Paul, BA; Hans Kerstan, MD; Mariana Chilton, DRPH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Failure to thrive (FTT) has a prevalence of between 3% and 10% in both rural and urban populations. FTT is seen as an indicator of physical and psychosocial problems and is associated with subsequent growth delay and cognitive deficiencies. FTT in low income communities can represent the &quot;tip of the iceberg&quot; and many children experience food insecurity which may act as a precursor to FTT. Children with FTT require prompt multidisciplinary management in order to prevent the long term consequences on brain and growth development. The goal of the GROW Clinic is to prevent the long-term health and developmental effects from FTT and its associated family dysfunction. The GROW Clinic is unique in that it employs a multi-disciplinary, team-based approach to child malnutrition that addresses the psychosocial and economic issues of nutrition. Results: Operational since 2005, the clinic has evaluated 146 children/families.100% of the children have weights in less than the 5th percentile at the time of referral (mean age is 18 months). More than 85% of the children at the GROW Clinic have gained an appropriate amount of weight for age (g/d) and have improved behaviors (mealtime structure, juice intake). 20% have been diagnosed with organic FTT (GER, asthma); 92% have psychosocial issues impacting their FTT(unstructured meals, food insecurity, behavior); 96% of patients have excessive fluid intake. One third of the children have developmental delays or behavior issues (ADHD). Social services have been implemented in more than 60% of the families from the GROW Clinic. About 80% of patients have been referred to community organizations (Early Intervention Services; skilled day care providers; DHS). Conclusion: The multidisciplinary approach to FTT implemented by the GROW team has made a major impact on both anthropometric and behavior change in the children/families. The GROW Clinic is working to test the impact of the multidisciplinary approach</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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