Multigenerational Nursing Workforce Value Differences and Work Environment: Impact on RNs' Turnover Intentions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147640
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multigenerational Nursing Workforce Value Differences and Work Environment: Impact on RNs' Turnover Intentions
Abstract:
Multigenerational Nursing Workforce Value Differences and Work Environment: Impact on RNs' Turnover Intentions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Farag, Amany A., PhD, Candidate, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:PhD Candidate
Co-Authors:Mary K. Anthony, RN, PhD; Jaclene Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, FAAN; Susan Tullai-McGuinness, PhD, RN; Katherine Jones, RN, PhD
[Clinical session research presentation] Achieving high quality healthcare, creating safe patient care environment, and retaining nurses are the main challenges facing the unit nurse managers. Meeting these challenges is hindered in part by the presence of four nursing generational cohorts working together. Each one of these cohorts embraces relatively different value systems. Among the different nurses' value systems, both professional and generational values are expected to play an instrumental role in guiding nurses' decisions and behaviors. Therefore, it is essential for the first line nurse managers to identify both values in order to create a climate that embraces the diverse values and retains nurses. The current nursing literature, however, lacks empirical evidence about the impact of professional and generational values on nurses' turnover. Thus, the purposes of this study are first, to identify and compare nurses' values across the four generational cohorts, second, to examine the direct, indirect and total effect of both professional and generational values and work environment on RNs? turnover intentions. Maehr and Braskamp's personal investment theory will be used to guide the study. A convenience sample of nurses working in non-magnet hospital(s) will be recruited to obtain the estimated sample size of 432 RNs. All full time, part time, and PRNs working in inpatient units, for at least 20 hrs/ week, regardless their age will receive the study surveys. Descriptive statistics and ANCOVA will be used to compare nurses' values. Path analysis will be used to achieve the second purpose. Given the current state of high turnover rates, evidences needed to understand from a more comprehensive approach how multigenerational value differences may influence nurses? turnover phenomenon. Identifying multigenerational value differences will add to the nursing body of knowledge; furthermore, will provide new lens through which educators and leaders could understand the needs, expectations and behaviors of the existing nursing workforce.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultigenerational Nursing Workforce Value Differences and Work Environment: Impact on RNs' Turnover Intentionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147640-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multigenerational Nursing Workforce Value Differences and Work Environment: Impact on RNs' Turnover Intentions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Farag, Amany A., PhD, Candidate, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aaf9@case.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary K. Anthony, RN, PhD; Jaclene Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, FAAN; Susan Tullai-McGuinness, PhD, RN; Katherine Jones, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Achieving high quality healthcare, creating safe patient care environment, and retaining nurses are the main challenges facing the unit nurse managers. Meeting these challenges is hindered in part by the presence of four nursing generational cohorts working together. Each one of these cohorts embraces relatively different value systems. Among the different nurses' value systems, both professional and generational values are expected to play an instrumental role in guiding nurses' decisions and behaviors. Therefore, it is essential for the first line nurse managers to identify both values in order to create a climate that embraces the diverse values and retains nurses. The current nursing literature, however, lacks empirical evidence about the impact of professional and generational values on nurses' turnover. Thus, the purposes of this study are first, to identify and compare nurses' values across the four generational cohorts, second, to examine the direct, indirect and total effect of both professional and generational values and work environment on RNs? turnover intentions. Maehr and Braskamp's personal investment theory will be used to guide the study. A convenience sample of nurses working in non-magnet hospital(s) will be recruited to obtain the estimated sample size of 432 RNs. All full time, part time, and PRNs working in inpatient units, for at least 20 hrs/ week, regardless their age will receive the study surveys. Descriptive statistics and ANCOVA will be used to compare nurses' values. Path analysis will be used to achieve the second purpose. Given the current state of high turnover rates, evidences needed to understand from a more comprehensive approach how multigenerational value differences may influence nurses? turnover phenomenon. Identifying multigenerational value differences will add to the nursing body of knowledge; furthermore, will provide new lens through which educators and leaders could understand the needs, expectations and behaviors of the existing nursing workforce.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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