Predictors of Perceived Susceptibility for Altered Breast-Ovarian Gene BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Women Who Have Never Been Diagnosed with Breast Cancer and Who Use Mammography Services

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147648
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Perceived Susceptibility for Altered Breast-Ovarian Gene BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Women Who Have Never Been Diagnosed with Breast Cancer and Who Use Mammography Services
Abstract:
Predictors of Perceived Susceptibility for Altered Breast-Ovarian Gene BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Women Who Have Never Been Diagnosed with Breast Cancer and Who Use Mammography Services
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Flynn, Janice B., DSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Kennesaw State University
Title:Associate Professor
[Scientific session research presentation] Advances in genetic science have lead to the discovery of specific genetic mutations that lead to early onset breast cancer (BC) and are thought to account for 5 - 10 % of all breast cancers. The study examined predictive relationships among perceived risk of having an altered breast gene, perceived susceptibility to BC, perceived seriousness of BC, awareness of genetic testing, perceived benefits and limitations of genetic testing, knowledge about IBC and BRCA1 & BRCA2, family history of breast and ovarian cancer, risk factors for BC, health motivation, age, race and intent to obtain genetic testing. A sample of 270 women was used. A composite questionnaire using the Champion Health Belief Subscales (1984;1993), National Center for Human Genome Research Cancer Studies Consortium Scales (Lerman, 1994: 1995), and the Myriad Family History Questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression. Perceived susceptibility to BC, intent to obtain genetic testing, and the number of 1st degree relatives with ovarian cancer were predictors of perceived risk of having an altered breast gene explaining 29 % of the variance. There were multiple significant correlations between variables that did not enter the regression equation, including: awareness of genetic testing with knowledge and age (r = .41 and r = .21, respectively, both at p<.01); perceived susceptibility to BC with perceived seriousness of BC, perceived barriers to genetic testing, 1st degree relatives with BC, and 1st degree relatives with BC < age 50 (r = .29; r = .25, r = .28, r = .21 respectively, all at p<.01) and; benefits and barriers to genetic testing (r = .46, p<.01). The results of this study provided preliminary data to guide nurses as they prepare for roles emerging from advances in genetic science.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Perceived Susceptibility for Altered Breast-Ovarian Gene BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Women Who Have Never Been Diagnosed with Breast Cancer and Who Use Mammography Servicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147648-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Perceived Susceptibility for Altered Breast-Ovarian Gene BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Women Who Have Never Been Diagnosed with Breast Cancer and Who Use Mammography Services</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flynn, Janice B., DSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kennesaw State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jflynn@kennesaw.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Advances in genetic science have lead to the discovery of specific genetic mutations that lead to early onset breast cancer (BC) and are thought to account for 5 - 10 % of all breast cancers. The study examined predictive relationships among perceived risk of having an altered breast gene, perceived susceptibility to BC, perceived seriousness of BC, awareness of genetic testing, perceived benefits and limitations of genetic testing, knowledge about IBC and BRCA1 &amp; BRCA2, family history of breast and ovarian cancer, risk factors for BC, health motivation, age, race and intent to obtain genetic testing. A sample of 270 women was used. A composite questionnaire using the Champion Health Belief Subscales (1984;1993), National Center for Human Genome Research Cancer Studies Consortium Scales (Lerman, 1994: 1995), and the Myriad Family History Questionnaire was used for data collection. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression. Perceived susceptibility to BC, intent to obtain genetic testing, and the number of 1st degree relatives with ovarian cancer were predictors of perceived risk of having an altered breast gene explaining 29 % of the variance. There were multiple significant correlations between variables that did not enter the regression equation, including: awareness of genetic testing with knowledge and age (r = .41 and r = .21, respectively, both at p&lt;.01); perceived susceptibility to BC with perceived seriousness of BC, perceived barriers to genetic testing, 1st degree relatives with BC, and 1st degree relatives with BC &lt; age 50 (r = .29; r = .25, r = .28, r = .21 respectively, all at p&lt;.01) and; benefits and barriers to genetic testing (r = .46, p&lt;.01). The results of this study provided preliminary data to guide nurses as they prepare for roles emerging from advances in genetic science.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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