Assessing Reactions of Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147658
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Reactions of Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer Disease
Abstract:
Assessing Reactions of Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer Disease
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Gonzalez, Elizabeth W., PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Drexel University
Title:Associate Professor
[Scientific session research presentation] It has been estimated that 80% of persons with Alzheimer?s disease are cared for at home by family members. With public policies that limit accessible and affordable formal care services, informal caregivers, largely women, will continue to bear the overwhelming responsibility for providing care to their loved ones. It is well documented that despite frustration and stress experienced by most family caregivers of persons with dementia they are willing to sacrifice anything to care for their loved ones at home as long as possible. Standardized instruments that assess specific type of caregiver stress salient at a given point in time should be useful to clinicians and researchers who assist family caregivers. This study describes the psychometric properties of a 14-item scale that assess caregivers? objective and subjective reactions to caregiving. Method: One hundred twenty-one minority women family caregivers who were living with and caring for person diagnosed with Alzheimer?s disease participated in the study. Family caregivers were interviewed face to face and responded to questionnaires that includes demographic information, caregiver burden scale and CESD. Methods for estimating internal consistency and homogeneity were used to test the reliability of the scale.Findings: Factor analysis on caregiver burden scale identified three domains: perceived infringement on caregiver's life, stress due to the emotional impact of caregiving responsibilities, and perception that care responsibilities are overly demanding. These domains have Cronbach?s alphas that ranged from .70 to .86. Evidence of their psychometric properties compared to CESD was found in two domains: subjective burden (r=.34, p.00) and perceived stress (r= .49, p =.00). Conclusion: Further application and testing of this instrument should be useful to researchers and practitioners who assist family caregivers with daily care decisions. This knowledge should help providers identify interventions that are appropriately matched to the source of stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Reactions of Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147658-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Reactions of Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer Disease</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gonzalez, Elizabeth W., PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Drexel University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ewg22@drexel.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] It has been estimated that 80% of persons with Alzheimer?s disease are cared for at home by family members. With public policies that limit accessible and affordable formal care services, informal caregivers, largely women, will continue to bear the overwhelming responsibility for providing care to their loved ones. It is well documented that despite frustration and stress experienced by most family caregivers of persons with dementia they are willing to sacrifice anything to care for their loved ones at home as long as possible. Standardized instruments that assess specific type of caregiver stress salient at a given point in time should be useful to clinicians and researchers who assist family caregivers. This study describes the psychometric properties of a 14-item scale that assess caregivers? objective and subjective reactions to caregiving. Method: One hundred twenty-one minority women family caregivers who were living with and caring for person diagnosed with Alzheimer?s disease participated in the study. Family caregivers were interviewed face to face and responded to questionnaires that includes demographic information, caregiver burden scale and CESD. Methods for estimating internal consistency and homogeneity were used to test the reliability of the scale.Findings: Factor analysis on caregiver burden scale identified three domains: perceived infringement on caregiver's life, stress due to the emotional impact of caregiving responsibilities, and perception that care responsibilities are overly demanding. These domains have Cronbach?s alphas that ranged from .70 to .86. Evidence of their psychometric properties compared to CESD was found in two domains: subjective burden (r=.34, p.00) and perceived stress (r= .49, p =.00).&nbsp;Conclusion: Further application and testing of this instrument should be useful to researchers and practitioners who assist family caregivers with daily care decisions. This knowledge should help providers identify interventions that are appropriately matched to the source of stress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.