Utilization of Equine-Assisted Interventions for Treatment of Grief Related Depression

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147662
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilization of Equine-Assisted Interventions for Treatment of Grief Related Depression
Abstract:
Utilization of Equine-Assisted Interventions for Treatment of Grief Related Depression
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Graham, J. R., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah
Title:Adjunct Professor
Co-Authors:Diane Leggett, MSN
[Clinical session research presentation] Regardless of the culture in which we live, the death of a loved one or other catastrophic loss is difficult to manage. Catastrophic loss affects us emotionally, spiritually, and physically, and is often associated with a decrease in health and the development of a depressed state. What is true about loss is that it is a normative human experience; and unfortunately, we all will experience the upset of catastrophic loss sometime during our lives. This research study dealt specifically with the mitigation of depression using Equine-assisted Wellness interventions in coping with catastrophic loss.  The study was based on Bandura's Model of Self-efficacy and Lazarus and Folkman's Transactional Model of Stress and Coping. The sample consisted of 32 women between 30 to 65 years of age that had suffered a loss within the past 24 months. Loss was defined as death of a loved one or pet, divorce, or decrease in physical mobility. The intervention group received five distinct equine experiences.. Depression and wellness scores, and biometric outcomes were used to assess the effect of the intervention. Pretest and posttest scores were analyzed using an ANCOVA. A significant difference was found between the control and treatment group, with the treatment group demonstrating less depression at the conclusion of the study. Physiologic measures were evaluated by graphing results against normative data. Even though it was hypothesized that vital signs would demonstrate a decrease following each intervention, they did not show a significant downward trend on any measure. The study used well-established, validated instruments to measure depression and physiologic measures and has identified a modality and methodology of decreasing grief-related depression. This pilot study demonstrated the efficacy of an alternative method for treatment of depression that can be utilized in multiple settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilization of Equine-Assisted Interventions for Treatment of Grief Related Depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147662-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Utilization of Equine-Assisted Interventions for Treatment of Grief Related Depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Graham, J. R., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rick.graham@questar.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diane Leggett, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Regardless of the culture in which we live, the death of a loved one or other catastrophic loss is difficult to manage. Catastrophic loss affects us emotionally, spiritually, and physically, and is often associated with a decrease in health and the development of a depressed state. What is true about loss is that it is a normative human experience; and unfortunately, we all will experience the upset of catastrophic loss sometime during our lives. This research study dealt specifically with the mitigation of depression using Equine-assisted Wellness interventions in coping with catastrophic loss.&nbsp; The study was based on Bandura's Model of Self-efficacy and Lazarus and Folkman's Transactional Model of Stress and Coping. The sample consisted of 32 women between 30 to 65 years of age that had suffered a loss within the past 24 months. Loss was defined as death of a loved one or pet, divorce, or decrease in physical mobility. The intervention group received five distinct equine experiences.. Depression and wellness scores, and biometric outcomes were used to assess the effect of the intervention. Pretest and posttest scores were analyzed using an ANCOVA. A significant difference was found between the control and treatment group, with the treatment group demonstrating less depression at the conclusion of the study. Physiologic measures were evaluated by graphing results against normative data. Even though it was hypothesized that vital signs would demonstrate a decrease following each intervention, they did not show a significant downward trend on any measure. The study used well-established, validated instruments to measure depression and physiologic measures and has identified a modality and methodology of decreasing grief-related depression. This pilot study demonstrated the efficacy of an alternative method for treatment of depression that can be utilized in multiple settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:34:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:34:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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