Predictors of NCLEX-RN Success in Baccalaureate Nursing Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147678
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of NCLEX-RN Success in Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Abstract:
Predictors of NCLEX-RN Success in Baccalaureate Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hoffman, Janice J., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Johns Hopkins University
Title:Faculty
Co-Authors:Elizabeth E. Hill, PhD, RN
[Symposium clinical presentation] Background: In 2006, the Health Resources and Services Administration reported the United States nursing shortage would grow to more than one-million by 2020. Complicating this shortage, between 1994 and 2004, success rates for first time licensure examinees (NCLEX-RN) decreased from 90% to 81%. The purpose of this study was to examine demographic and educational factors that predict NCLEX-RN success. Methods: Guided by Perry?s Ethical and Intellectual Development Model, a descriptive correlational analysis was conducted using secondary data from a large baccalaureate nursing program. Demographics, standardized educational measures, the Nurse Entrance Test (NET) and Critical Thinking Process Test (CTPT), and NCLEX-RN results for 347 traditional and accelerated students were analyzed. Hierarchical logistic regression identified predictors of first time NCLEX-RN success. Results: In Model 1, Africans were 80% less likely than African-Americans and Caucasians to achieve first time NCLEX-RN success (OR 0.20, 95% CI: 0.08 - 0.49). In Model 2, African ethnicity remained significant (OR 0.29, 95% CI: 0.10 - 0.85) and GPA (OR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.04 - 6.76) and NET Reading (OR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01 - 1.08) were significant. In Model 3, when CTPT was entered, all other predictors became non-significant, indicating that for every  one-point increase in CTPT, there was an 11% increased likelihood of first attempt NCLEX-RN success (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05 - 1.18). Conclusions: While additional studies need to be conducted to examine other predictors of NCLEX-RN success, these findings indicate the need for design of interventions to improve both reading and critical thinking skills. Maximizing student success and first time NCLEX-RN pass rates, will have a direct impact on the nursing shortage.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of NCLEX-RN Success in Baccalaureate Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147678-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of NCLEX-RN Success in Baccalaureate Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hoffman, Janice J., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jhoffm10@son.jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth E. Hill, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium clinical presentation] Background: In 2006, the Health Resources and Services Administration reported the United States nursing shortage would grow to more than one-million by 2020. Complicating this shortage, between 1994 and 2004, success rates for first time licensure examinees (NCLEX-RN) decreased from 90% to 81%. The purpose of this study was to examine demographic and educational factors that predict NCLEX-RN success. Methods: Guided by Perry?s Ethical and Intellectual Development Model, a descriptive correlational analysis was conducted using secondary data from a large baccalaureate nursing program. Demographics, standardized educational measures, the Nurse Entrance Test (NET) and Critical Thinking Process Test (CTPT), and NCLEX-RN results for 347 traditional and accelerated students were analyzed. Hierarchical logistic regression identified predictors of first time NCLEX-RN success. Results: In Model 1, Africans were 80% less likely than African-Americans and Caucasians to achieve first time NCLEX-RN success (OR 0.20, 95% CI: 0.08 - 0.49). In Model 2, African ethnicity remained significant (OR 0.29, 95% CI: 0.10 - 0.85) and GPA (OR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.04 - 6.76) and NET Reading (OR 1.04, 95% CI: 1.01 - 1.08) were significant. In Model 3, when CTPT was entered, all other predictors became non-significant, indicating that for every &nbsp;one-point increase in CTPT, there was an 11% increased likelihood of first attempt NCLEX-RN success (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05 - 1.18). Conclusions: While additional studies need to be conducted to examine other predictors of NCLEX-RN success, these findings indicate the need for design of interventions to improve both reading and critical thinking skills. Maximizing student success and first time NCLEX-RN pass rates, will have a direct impact on the nursing shortage.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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