2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147685
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Birth Events on Maternal Mood and Functional Status
Abstract:
Effects of Birth Events on Maternal Mood and Functional Status
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hunker, Diane F., BSN, MBA, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Doctoral Student
Co-Authors:Thelma Patrick, PhD, RN
[Clinical session research presentation] In 2003, over 210,000 deliveries were the result of precipitous, prolonged or dysfunctional labor, while breech or atypical fetal presentations accounted for over 156,000 births. Fetal distress in labor was evident in over 132,000 deliveries in 2003 (National Vital Statistics Report, 2005). Complications can occur in labor or delivery which are unexpected. These unplanned, adverse events for the mother may generate a negative response during the early postpartum period, resulting in disruption of usual functioning and mood. Alterations in maternal mood can lead to a more debilitating condition known as Postpartum Depression.  Postpartum Depression negatively affects the quality of life and functional status of mothers and infants. High levels of maternal depressive symptoms have been associated with parenting skills, infant attachment, infant behavioral problems and infant cognition (Beck 2002). Little research has been completed exploring the relationship of adverse, unplanned events in labor or delivery and maternal mood, functional status and infant care in the immediate postpartum period. The primary aim of this secondary data analysis was to examine the relationship of adverse, unplanned events in labor or delivery and maternal mood, functional status and infant care at two weeks postpartum. A secondary aim was to examine the relationship of postpartum social support on maternal outcomes following an unplanned event. A correlational, cross-sectional design was used. Quantitative data was collected from mothers enrolled in the larger, transdisciplinary study, "Antidepressant Use during Pregnancy"  (ADUP; MH R01 60335, PI: Katherine Wisner, MD). To investigate the primary and secondary aims, statistical modeling using multiple linear regression analysis was used. Results and conclusion will be available for dissemination by November 2007. This research should elucidate the significance of mothers responses to adverse birth events, thus suggesting opportunities for improved intervention and treatment in the immediate postpartum period.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Birth Events on Maternal Mood and Functional Statusen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147685-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Birth Events on Maternal Mood and Functional Status</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hunker, Diane F., BSN, MBA, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dfa2@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Thelma Patrick, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] In 2003, over 210,000 deliveries were the result of precipitous, prolonged or dysfunctional labor, while breech or atypical fetal presentations accounted for over 156,000 births. Fetal distress in labor was evident in over 132,000 deliveries in 2003 (National Vital Statistics Report, 2005). Complications can occur in labor or delivery which are unexpected. These unplanned, adverse events for the mother may generate a negative response during the early postpartum period, resulting in disruption of usual functioning and mood. Alterations in maternal mood can lead to a more debilitating condition known as Postpartum Depression.&nbsp; Postpartum Depression negatively affects the quality of life and functional status of mothers and infants. High levels of maternal depressive symptoms have been associated with parenting skills, infant attachment, infant behavioral problems and infant cognition (Beck 2002). Little research has been completed exploring the relationship of adverse, unplanned events in labor or delivery and maternal mood, functional status and infant care in the immediate postpartum period. The primary aim of this secondary data analysis was to examine the relationship of adverse, unplanned events in labor or delivery and maternal mood, functional status and infant care at two weeks postpartum. A secondary aim was to examine the relationship of postpartum social support on maternal outcomes following an unplanned event. A correlational, cross-sectional design was used. Quantitative data was collected from mothers enrolled in the larger, transdisciplinary study, &quot;Antidepressant Use during Pregnancy&quot;&nbsp; (ADUP; MH R01 60335, PI: Katherine Wisner, MD). To investigate the primary and secondary aims, statistical modeling using multiple linear regression analysis was used. Results and conclusion will be available for dissemination by November 2007. This research should elucidate the significance of mothers responses to adverse birth events, thus suggesting opportunities for improved intervention and treatment in the immediate postpartum period.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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