Assessing the Knowledge, Perceptions, and Practices of Young Condom Users

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147691
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing the Knowledge, Perceptions, and Practices of Young Condom Users
Abstract:
Assessing the Knowledge, Perceptions, and Practices of Young Condom Users
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kane, Debbie, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Windsor
Title:Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator
Co-Authors:Maher M. El-Masri, RN, PhD; Susan M. Fox-Wasylyshyn, RN, PhD
[Scientific session research presentation] Background: In the absence of vaccination against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), use of condoms may be the most effective preventive tool. Although, condoms are tested for their pre-use durability, their in-use durability varies according to condom material. The literature suggests that condom research has focused on consumer attitudes toward the use of condoms, but little attention has been paid to consumers' knowledge of the factors impacting condom durability, the potential health risks associated with the use of condoms, and the relationship between sexual behaviours and knowledge of condoms. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of young adult condom users regarding factors that impact their durability and the health risks associated with the use of condoms. Method: A survey was administered to a random sample of 250 undergraduate university students. The survey was composed of 29 questions that were developed to collect data pertaining to sexual behaviours and concerns, use of condoms during sexual acts, and knowledge and behaviours pertaining to condom use. Results: The results suggested that 83.6% (n = 209) of participants were sexually active. The majority (50.7%; n = 106) of participants became sexually active between 18 and 21 years. While pregnancy was a concern to 68.4% (n = 141) of participants, STI's were a concern to only 35.8% (n = 73). In fact, more participants indicated using condoms to prevent pregnancy (86.4% n = 165) than STI?s (74.5%; n = 143). Although 83.1% (n = 152) of participants reported believing that condom material impacts its protective effectiveness, only 51.6% (n = 96) consider material when selecting a condom.  Conclusion: The findings of this study highlight that young adult condom users are not concerned about the factors that may impact condom durability as an effective tool for the prevention of STI's.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing the Knowledge, Perceptions, and Practices of Young Condom Usersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147691-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing the Knowledge, Perceptions, and Practices of Young Condom Users</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kane, Debbie, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Windsor</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Graduate Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dkane@uwindsor.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Maher M. El-Masri, RN, PhD; Susan M. Fox-Wasylyshyn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Background: In the absence of vaccination against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), use of condoms may be the most effective preventive tool. Although, condoms are tested for their pre-use durability, their in-use durability varies according to condom material. The literature suggests that condom research has focused on consumer attitudes toward the use of condoms, but little attention has been paid to consumers' knowledge of the factors impacting condom durability, the potential health risks associated with the use of condoms, and the relationship between sexual behaviours and knowledge of condoms. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of young adult condom users regarding factors that impact their durability and the health risks associated with the use of condoms. Method: A survey was administered to a random sample of 250 undergraduate university students. The survey was composed of 29 questions that were developed to collect data pertaining to sexual behaviours and concerns, use of condoms during sexual acts, and knowledge and behaviours pertaining to condom use. Results: The results suggested that 83.6% (n = 209) of participants were sexually active. The majority (50.7%; n = 106) of participants became sexually active between 18 and 21 years. While pregnancy was a concern to 68.4% (n = 141) of participants, STI's were a concern to only 35.8% (n = 73). In fact, more participants indicated using condoms to prevent pregnancy (86.4% n = 165) than STI?s (74.5%; n = 143). Although 83.1% (n = 152) of participants reported believing that condom material impacts its protective effectiveness, only 51.6% (n = 96) consider material when selecting a condom. &nbsp;Conclusion: The findings of this study highlight that young adult condom users are not concerned about the factors that may impact condom durability as an effective tool for the prevention of STI's.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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