Hypertension Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors among Middle-Aged Korean-Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147695
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hypertension Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors among Middle-Aged Korean-Americans
Abstract:
Hypertension Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors among Middle-Aged Korean-Americans
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kim, Miyong, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Johns Hopkins University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Hae-Ra Han, RN, PhD; Kim B. Kim, PhD
[Scientific session research presentation] Higher rates of uncontrolled hypertension (HBP) among Korean Americans (KA) have been consistently reported. This paper describes detailed profiles of middle-aged (40 to 64 years) KA with HBP concerning their knowledge, beliefs, and control behaviors. A total of 445 participants in the Self-Help Intervention Program for HBP care (SHIP-HBP), a culturally tailored trial for HBP management in KA through lifestyle approaches and telehealth technology, completed baseline assessments to determine HBP control status and knowledge, beliefs, and practices related to HBP control. About 55% of the sample were receiving antihypertensive therapy, and less than one-third had controlled BP (< 140/90 mm Hg). Sex differences were observed: women were more likely than men to have controlled BP and lower diastolic BP and to have been on HBP medication. Lower rates of smoking, drinking, and overweight or obesity were also observed more frequently in women. When asked what the most important behavioral factor was for controlling BP, about a quarter reported cutting down on salt, followed by exercise and medication taking. While poor HBP control remains a common problem that contributes to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, particularly among ethnic minorities, our findings highlight the need to test the effects of intervention programs, suitably modified to meet the language, cultural, and individual needs of this high-risk population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHypertension Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors among Middle-Aged Korean-Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147695-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hypertension Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors among Middle-Aged Korean-Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Miyong, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Johns Hopkins University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkim@son.jhmi.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hae-Ra Han, RN, PhD; Kim B. Kim, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Higher rates of uncontrolled hypertension (HBP) among Korean Americans (KA) have been consistently reported. This&nbsp;paper describes detailed profiles of middle-aged (40 to 64 years) KA with HBP concerning their knowledge, beliefs, and control behaviors. A total of 445 participants in the Self-Help Intervention Program for HBP care (SHIP-HBP), a culturally tailored trial for HBP management in KA through lifestyle approaches and telehealth technology,&nbsp;completed baseline assessments to determine HBP control status and knowledge, beliefs, and practices related to HBP control. About 55% of the sample were receiving antihypertensive therapy, and less than one-third had controlled BP (&lt; 140/90 mm Hg). Sex differences were observed: women were more likely than men to have controlled BP and lower diastolic BP and to have been on HBP medication. Lower rates of smoking, drinking, and overweight or obesity were also observed more frequently in women.&nbsp;When asked what the most important behavioral factor was for controlling BP, about a quarter reported cutting down on salt, followed by exercise and medication taking. While poor HBP control remains a common problem that contributes to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, particularly among ethnic minorities, our findings&nbsp;highlight the need to test the effects of intervention programs, suitably modified to meet the language, cultural, and individual needs of this high-risk population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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