Using Scenarios in Qualitative Research: Experiences from a Women's Communication Study in Gaborone, Botswana

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147708
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Scenarios in Qualitative Research: Experiences from a Women's Communication Study in Gaborone, Botswana
Abstract:
Using Scenarios in Qualitative Research: Experiences from a Women's Communication Study in Gaborone, Botswana
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Magowe, Mabel K. M., BEd, MSc
P.I. Institution Name:Emory University
Title:PhD Student
Co-Authors:Ora Lea Strickland, PhD, RN, FAAN; Marcia M. Holstad, DSN
[Scientific session research presentation] Introduction: Research on sensitive topics such as human sexcality requires methods that can take into account potential participants' discomforts during data collection. The use of scenarios presents a potential method that can increase participation while protectineg the privacy of individuals, especially for exploring sensitive topics within a group setting. This paper provides information on the use of scenarios  for qualitative research. It also shares the results of qualitative study that applied scenarios for elicitation research. Purpose: 1) To discuss the use of scenarios in qualitative research on sensitive issues. 2) To provide the results of a women's communication study that applied scenario-vignettes conducted in Gaborone, Botswana. Methods: 1) Intergarated literature review from MEDLINE, CINHAUL, PSYCHinfo, and GOOGLE. 2) Presentation of results of a women's communication study that applied scenarios, conducted in Gaborone, Botswana in the context of HIV prevention. Results: Scenarios were found to be useful in qualitative research to explore sensitive topics. Six scenario-vignettes were developed based on extensive literature review and the researcher' experience working with women. Key themes were: consequences of discussing safer sex with partner, identification of significant referents in the relationship, motivation to comply with significant referents' aspirations, and self-efficacy for talking to partners about safer sex. Subthemes were: advantages and disadvantages of health protective sexual communication, influence of significant referents including partners, perceived ease or difficulty with, and effectiveness of safer sex communication for achieving safer sex protection. Facilitating factors were: partner's pesonality, the use of influence tactics, knowledge about HIV/AIDS and participatition in AIDS prevention programs. Barriers were: general difficulties in talking about sexual matters and the partner's non-response. Discussions: Scenarios elicited useful data while encouraging participation and protecting the privacy of the women during qualitative research related to safer sex communication. Information collected was used to elicit themes that were used to derive instrument items for a quantitative study to explore health protective sexual communication among young women in Botswana.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Scenarios in Qualitative Research: Experiences from a Women's Communication Study in Gaborone, Botswanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147708-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Scenarios in Qualitative Research: Experiences from a Women's Communication Study in Gaborone, Botswana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Magowe, Mabel K. M., BEd, MSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emory University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mmagowe@emory.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ora Lea Strickland, PhD, RN, FAAN; Marcia M. Holstad, DSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Introduction: Research on sensitive topics such&nbsp;as human sexcality requires methods that can take into account potential participants' discomforts during data collection. The use of scenarios presents a potential method that can&nbsp;increase participation while protectineg the privacy of individuals, especially for exploring sensitive topics within a group setting. This paper provides information on the use of scenarios&nbsp;&nbsp;for qualitative research. It also shares the results of qualitative study that applied scenarios for elicitation research. Purpose: 1) To discuss the use of scenarios in qualitative research on sensitive issues. 2) To&nbsp;provide the results of a women's communication study that applied scenario-vignettes conducted in Gaborone, Botswana. Methods: 1) Intergarated literature review from MEDLINE, CINHAUL, PSYCHinfo, and GOOGLE. 2) Presentation of results of a women's communication study that applied scenarios, conducted in Gaborone, Botswana in the context of HIV prevention. Results: Scenarios were found to be useful in qualitative research to explore sensitive topics.&nbsp;Six scenario-vignettes were developed based on extensive literature review and the researcher'&nbsp;experience working with women. Key themes were: consequences of discussing safer sex with partner, identification of significant referents in the relationship, motivation to comply with significant referents'&nbsp;aspirations, and self-efficacy for talking to partners about safer sex. Subthemes were: advantages and disadvantages of health protective sexual communication, influence of significant referents including partners, perceived ease or difficulty with, and effectiveness of safer sex communication for achieving safer sex protection.&nbsp;Facilitating factors were: partner's pesonality, the use of influence tactics, knowledge about HIV/AIDS and participatition in AIDS prevention programs. Barriers were: general difficulties in talking about sexual matters and the partner's non-response. Discussions: Scenarios elicited useful data while encouraging participation and protecting the privacy of the&nbsp;women during qualitative research related to safer sex communication.&nbsp;Information collected was used to elicit themes that were used to derive instrument items&nbsp;for a quantitative&nbsp;study to explore health protective sexual communication among young women in Botswana.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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