2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147714
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Omega-3 Fatty Acids Effect on Wound Healing
Abstract:
Omega-3 Fatty Acids Effect on Wound Healing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:McDaniel, Jodi, MS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Ohio State University
Title:Graduate Student
Co-Authors:Karen Ahijevych, PhD, RN; Wendy Blakely, PhD, RN
[Scientific session research presentation] Purpose: To examine effects of Omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA), obtained from fish oil, on wound healing. The specific aims were: 1) to compare pro-inflammatory levels at blister sites between healthy individuals receiving Omega-3 supplements and a control group; and 2) to compare wound healing between the two groups.  It was hypothesized that reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production through consumption of Omega-3 fatty acids could delay the necessary inflammatory stage of healing.Design and Method: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, experimental design included Group 1 (n=16), receiving Omega-3 fatty supplements for four weeks prior to the blistering procedure and Group 2 (n=14), receiving a placebo for 4 weeks. The independent variable was ?-3 fatty acid supplements, which were biochemically confirmed by plasma per gas chromatography. Dependent variables were the inflammatory stage of healing measured by proinflammatory cytokines via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and wound healing determined by single digital camera photogrammetry.  Pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured in blister serum at 5 and 24 hours post formation of 8 small blisters on nondominant forearm. Salivary cortisol and a Perceived Stress Scale evaluated stress levels, which can affect healing. Wound areas were measured daily until 100% healed.  Subjects completed 3-day food diaries at baseline and four weeks with micronutrients quantified by Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR). Preliminary Findings:  Subjects = 30 healthy individuals, 57% women and 43% male, (mean ± SD age, 25.4 +/- 6.4 years). Ethnicity = 77% White, 13% Asian and 10% African American. Mean days to healing = 10.6 +/- 3.6 days (active subgroup = 11.1 +/- 4.4; placebo = 9.8 +/- 2.1). Fatty acid, pro-inflammatory cytokine and salivary cortisol assays are in process, as are PSS scores and nutritional analyses.Conclusions:  Pending the outcome, evidence may encourage discontinuation of supplemental Omega-3 fatty acids prior to elective surgery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOmega-3 Fatty Acids Effect on Wound Healingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147714-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Omega-3 Fatty Acids Effect on Wound Healing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McDaniel, Jodi, MS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmcdaniel@ctcn.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Ahijevych, PhD, RN; Wendy Blakely, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Purpose:&nbsp;To examine effects of Omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA), obtained from fish oil, on wound healing. The specific aims were: 1) to compare pro-inflammatory levels at blister sites between healthy individuals receiving Omega-3 supplements and a control group; and 2) to compare wound healing between the two groups. &nbsp;It was hypothesized that reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production through consumption of Omega-3 fatty acids could delay the necessary inflammatory stage of healing.Design and Method:&nbsp;A prospective, randomized, double-blind, experimental design included Group 1 (n=16), receiving Omega-3 fatty supplements for four weeks prior to the blistering procedure and Group 2 (n=14), receiving a placebo for 4 weeks. The independent variable was ?-3 fatty acid supplements, which were biochemically confirmed by plasma per gas chromatography. Dependent variables were the inflammatory stage of healing measured by proinflammatory cytokines via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and wound healing determined by single digital camera photogrammetry.&nbsp; Pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured in blister serum at 5 and 24 hours post formation of 8 small blisters on nondominant forearm. Salivary cortisol and a Perceived Stress Scale evaluated stress levels, which can affect healing. Wound areas were measured daily until 100% healed.&nbsp; Subjects completed 3-day food diaries at baseline and four weeks with micronutrients quantified by Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR). Preliminary Findings:&nbsp; Subjects = 30 healthy individuals, 57% women and 43% male, (mean &plusmn; SD age, 25.4 +/- 6.4 years). Ethnicity = 77% White, 13% Asian and 10% African American. Mean days to healing = 10.6 +/- 3.6 days (active subgroup = 11.1 +/- 4.4; placebo = 9.8 +/- 2.1). Fatty acid, pro-inflammatory cytokine and salivary cortisol assays are in process, as are PSS scores and nutritional analyses.Conclusions:&nbsp; Pending the outcome, evidence may encourage discontinuation of supplemental Omega-3 fatty acids prior to elective surgery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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