Learning Behavior of Students in Nursing Skills Laboratories: Qualitative Evidence to Support Faculty Development in Japan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147724
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning Behavior of Students in Nursing Skills Laboratories: Qualitative Evidence to Support Faculty Development in Japan
Abstract:
Learning Behavior of Students in Nursing Skills Laboratories: Qualitative Evidence to Support Faculty Development in Japan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Miyashiba, Tomoko, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Doctoral Program in Nursing, Chiba University
Title:Student
Co-Authors:Naomi Funashima, RN, DNSc
[Scientific session research presentation] BACKGROUND: Nursing students in Japan recently lack sufficient opportunities to care for patients in clinical settings because of hospitals' stepped-up measures to safeguard patients' safety. Students must consequently achieve their goals entirely in nursing skills laboratories on campus. Faculty members must teach skills according to features of learning behavior in laboratories for evidence-based practice. OBJECTIVE: To conceptualize the students' behavior of interactions with faculty or other students in nursing skills laboratories. DESIGN: Qualitative and inductive design. METHOD: The Methodology for Conceptualization of Nursing (Funashima, 1999) was adopted. Data were collected through participant observations of 110 interactions between students and faculty or among students in nursing skills laboratories in four colleges and seven junior colleges in Japan. All behaviors were mutually compared and coded from the viewpoint of what students do to achieve their goals in laboratories. The codes were categorized by their similarities and differences. Trustworthiness was established in accordance with Lincoln and Guba's principles (1985). FINDINGS & IMPLICATIONS: Twelve concepts emerged: Demonstrating skills with standard procedures by outcomes of learning, Demonstrating skills or accepting them by creating simulations, Practicing skills repeatedly to overcome fears about application of their skills from classroom to clinical settings, Practicing skills smoothly with approval of faculty and other students, Promoting or preventing practices through interaction among students, Improving skills and practices through an understanding of instruction or failure at understanding it, Injuring other members or being injured by unskilled performance, Acting quickly and contriving to achieve their goals as scheduled, and so on. To foster evidence-based practice in nursing skills laboratories, factors of student and faculty interactions that promote the success of goal attainment should be described qualitatively and inductively in a future study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning Behavior of Students in Nursing Skills Laboratories: Qualitative Evidence to Support Faculty Development in Japanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147724-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning Behavior of Students in Nursing Skills Laboratories: Qualitative Evidence to Support Faculty Development in Japan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miyashiba, Tomoko, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Program in Nursing, Chiba University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">miiya@yb3.so-net.ne.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Naomi Funashima, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] BACKGROUND: Nursing students in Japan recently lack sufficient opportunities to care for patients in clinical settings because of hospitals' stepped-up measures to safeguard patients' safety. Students must consequently achieve their goals entirely in nursing skills laboratories on campus. Faculty members must teach skills according to features of learning behavior in laboratories for evidence-based practice. OBJECTIVE: To conceptualize the students' behavior of interactions with faculty or other students in nursing skills laboratories. DESIGN: Qualitative and inductive design. METHOD: The Methodology for Conceptualization of Nursing (Funashima, 1999) was adopted. Data were collected through participant observations of 110 interactions between students and faculty or among students in nursing skills laboratories in four colleges and seven junior colleges in Japan. All behaviors were mutually compared and coded from the viewpoint of what students do to achieve their goals in laboratories. The codes were categorized by their similarities and differences. Trustworthiness was established in accordance with Lincoln and Guba's principles (1985). FINDINGS &amp; IMPLICATIONS: Twelve concepts emerged: Demonstrating skills with standard procedures by outcomes of learning, Demonstrating skills or accepting them by creating simulations, Practicing skills repeatedly to overcome fears about application of their skills from classroom to clinical settings, Practicing skills smoothly with approval of faculty and other students, Promoting or preventing practices through interaction among students, Improving skills and practices through an understanding of instruction or failure at understanding it, Injuring other members or being injured by unskilled performance, Acting quickly and contriving to achieve their goals as scheduled, and so on. To foster evidence-based practice in nursing skills laboratories, factors of student and faculty interactions that promote the success of goal attainment should be described qualitatively and inductively in a future study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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