An Ecological Model for Intimate Partner Violence, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Alcohol /Substance Dependence

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147730
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Ecological Model for Intimate Partner Violence, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Alcohol /Substance Dependence
Abstract:
An Ecological Model for Intimate Partner Violence, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Alcohol /Substance Dependence
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Mulvihill, Deanna L., RN, BScNEd, MSc, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Western Ontario
Title:PhD candidate
Co-Authors:Marilyn Ford-Gilboe, RN, PhD; Helene Berman, RN, PhD; Cheryl Forchuk, RN, PhD; Rick Csiernik, MSW, PhD, RSW
[Clinical session research presentation] Pathways that link illness and social problems are often non-linear, involving multiple intervening variables and feedback loops. Human ecology theory focuses on humans as both biological and social beings that interact in a reciprocal relationship with their environment (Bubolz and Sontag, 1993). This is the basis of all ecological models for health promotion. While many other models focus on one dimension, ecological models are comprehensive multilevel models emphasizing a shared framework targeting all levels of the environment that impact on individual and collective behavior and provide linkages between the different levels. The philosophical foundation of this model is that behavior does not occur in a vacuum. This paper will outline the development and advantages of ecological models. An example of the syndemic disease of violence, posttraumatic stress disorder and subsequent alcohol dependence will be utilized to demonstrate how this model can illuminate the impact of health determinants across the lifespan. It will also highlight its use in integrating research results, determining future research direction and practice strategies to address chronic diseases at an individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and public policy level.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Ecological Model for Intimate Partner Violence, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Alcohol /Substance Dependenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147730-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Ecological Model for Intimate Partner Violence, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Alcohol /Substance Dependence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mulvihill, Deanna L., RN, BScNEd, MSc, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Western Ontario</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmulvih@uwo.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn Ford-Gilboe, RN, PhD; Helene Berman, RN, PhD; Cheryl Forchuk, RN, PhD; Rick Csiernik, MSW, PhD, RSW</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Clinical session research presentation] Pathways that link illness and social problems are often non-linear, involving multiple intervening variables and feedback loops. Human ecology theory focuses on humans as both biological and social beings that interact in a reciprocal relationship with their environment (Bubolz and Sontag, 1993). This is the basis of all ecological models for health promotion. While many other models focus on one dimension, ecological models are comprehensive multilevel models emphasizing a shared framework targeting all levels of the environment that impact on individual and collective behavior and provide linkages between the different levels. The philosophical foundation of this model is that behavior does not occur in a vacuum. This paper will outline the development and advantages of ecological models. An example of the syndemic disease of violence, posttraumatic stress disorder and subsequent alcohol dependence will be utilized to demonstrate how this model can illuminate the impact of health determinants across the lifespan. It will also highlight its use in integrating research results, determining future research direction and practice strategies to address chronic diseases at an individual, interpersonal, organizational, community and public policy level.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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