Nurses Perception of Violence in the Workplace in a Major Trauma Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147748
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses Perception of Violence in the Workplace in a Major Trauma Center
Abstract:
Nurses Perception of Violence in the Workplace in a Major Trauma Center
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Rhodes, Mattie L., RN, CNS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:State University of New York at Buffalo
Title:Clinical Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Karen Ziemianski, RN, MSN; Christopher Tait, RN, BSN
[Scientific session research presentation] Violence and assault rates have become a major public health concern; drawing national attention .It is an epidemic that constitutes one of the most dangerous occupational hazards facing nursing. An estimated 2 million acts of nonfatal work related violence occur annually in the United States workplace. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that violence in the healthcare setting represents thirty-eight percent of all workplace violence. Forty eight percent of nonfatal injuries occurred primarily to nurses. Nurses are three times more likely to experience violence than any other healthcare professional. Workplace violence is also an international health concern, as documented in international studies in Sweden, Turkey and the United Kingdom. The purpose of this research is to examine nurses' perception of violence experiences in the workplace, and to determine what meanings they attached to experiences. A retrospective descriptive study design was used to examine nurses' perceptions of the experiences they had related to workplace violence in a 550-bed major trauma center, Western New York area. Convenience sampling was used to select nurses, to complete a structured questionnaire. Data was summarized using descriptive statistics: frequency distributions and crosstabulations.  Pearson's product moment correlations and T- Test were used to examine the relationships between variables. Chi-Square was used to determine the significance of results. Preliminary results showed that more nurses were exposed to verbal violence (85%) than physical violence (40%). Overall nurses did a better job identifying events as physical than verbal violence. Primary sources of verbal violence were: patients, visitors, physicians, peers, and supervisors. The primary source of physical violence was patients. Violent experiences were often not reported or underreported the primary reason given was the acceptance as a part of the job. This information can assist to identify practice changes, which can enhance a safer environment for patients and healthcare professionals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses Perception of Violence in the Workplace in a Major Trauma Centeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147748-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses Perception of Violence in the Workplace in a Major Trauma Center</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rhodes, Mattie L., RN, CNS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">State University of New York at Buffalo</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mlrhodes@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Ziemianski, RN, MSN; Christopher Tait, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Violence and assault rates have become a major public health concern; drawing national attention .It is an epidemic that constitutes one of the most dangerous occupational hazards facing nursing. An estimated 2 million acts of nonfatal work related violence occur annually in the United States workplace. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that violence in the healthcare setting represents thirty-eight percent of all workplace violence. Forty eight percent of nonfatal injuries occurred primarily to nurses. Nurses are three times more likely to experience violence than any other healthcare professional. Workplace violence is also an international health concern, as documented in international studies in Sweden, Turkey and the United Kingdom. The purpose of this research is to examine nurses' perception of violence experiences in the workplace, and to determine what meanings they attached to experiences. A retrospective descriptive study design was used to examine nurses' perceptions of the experiences they had related to workplace violence in a 550-bed major trauma center, Western New York area. Convenience sampling was used to select nurses, to complete a structured questionnaire. Data was summarized using descriptive statistics: frequency distributions and crosstabulations.&nbsp;&nbsp;Pearson's product moment correlations and T- Test were used to examine the relationships between variables. Chi-Square was used to determine the significance of results. Preliminary results showed&nbsp;that more nurses were exposed to verbal violence (85%) than physical violence (40%). Overall nurses did a better job identifying events as physical than verbal violence. Primary sources of verbal violence were: patients, visitors, physicians, peers, and supervisors. The primary source of physical violence was patients. Violent experiences were often not reported or underreported the primary reason given was the acceptance as a part of the job. This information can assist to identify practice changes, which can enhance a safer environment for patients and healthcare professionals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:35:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:35:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.