2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147767
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dying Well - A Qualitative Exploration
Abstract:
Dying Well - A Qualitative Exploration
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Perkins, Margaret, BSN, MSN, FNP-C
P.I. Institution Name:Extended Care Physicians
Title:RN, FNP-C
Co-Authors:Vincent Hall, RN, PhD; Gene McDowell, PhD; Judy Mallory, RN, EdD
Dying well, a balance between science and wisdom at the end of life, is the topic of this qualitative study. Prior research suggests that in the United States there is a strong cultural denial of death, a desire to control death through a predictable hospital routine, a need for increased communication between health care providers and patients about end-of-life decisions, and a role for the nurse practitioner or mid-level provider to counsel patients about end-of-life decisions, ideally, while the patient is still relatively healthy. The purpose of this research was to identify common themes and concerns of the individual in exploring the issue of dying well, to portray various visions of an ideal death, and to depict the acts the individual takes to ensure that they do indeed, die well. Using grounded theory methodology, open-ended interviews were conducted with 6 participants over a 4-month period of time. The constant comparative method was used for data analysis. Four tasks of dying-well were identified during the study. These are: (a) taking care of business, (b) leaving loved ones, (c) forming memories, and (d) bridging the gap. Characteristics of each task are described. The tasks tend to fall into physical, psychological, and social groupings. Practice implications are suggested for mid-level providers interested in end-of-life planning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDying Well - A Qualitative Explorationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147767-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dying Well - A Qualitative Exploration</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Perkins, Margaret, BSN, MSN, FNP-C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Extended Care Physicians</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">RN, FNP-C</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mperkins1@charter.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Vincent Hall, RN, PhD; Gene McDowell, PhD; Judy Mallory, RN, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Dying well, a balance between science and wisdom at the end of life, is the topic of this qualitative study. Prior research suggests that in the United States there is a strong cultural denial of death, a desire to control death through a predictable hospital routine, a need for increased communication between health care providers and patients about end-of-life decisions, and a role for the nurse practitioner or mid-level provider to counsel patients about end-of-life decisions, ideally, while the patient is still relatively healthy. The purpose of this research was to identify common themes and concerns of the individual in exploring the issue of dying well, to portray various visions of an ideal death, and to depict the acts the individual takes to ensure that they do indeed, die well. Using grounded theory methodology, open-ended interviews were conducted with 6 participants over a 4-month period of time. The constant comparative method was used for data analysis. Four tasks of dying-well were identified during the study. These are: (a) taking care of business, (b) leaving loved ones, (c) forming memories, and (d) bridging the gap. Characteristics of each task are described. The tasks tend to fall into physical, psychological, and social groupings. Practice implications are suggested for mid-level providers interested in end-of-life planning.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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