The Relationship of Health Beliefs, Including Self-Care Practices, and the Performance of Breast Self-Examination in Registered Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147773
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Health Beliefs, Including Self-Care Practices, and the Performance of Breast Self-Examination in Registered Nurses
Abstract:
The Relationship of Health Beliefs, Including Self-Care Practices, and the Performance of Breast Self-Examination in Registered Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Pirkle, L. Darlene, RNC, MSN, CCE, CLC
P.I. Institution Name:Valdosta State University
Title:Ms.
Current estimates indicate that one in eight women will develop breast cancer during their lifetimes according to Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2004 (American Cancer Society, 2004). Breast self-examination (BSE) is an important screening tool in the early detection and treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship, if any, of health beliefs, including self-care practices, and the performance of breast self-examination in registered nurses employed by a hospital in southern Georgia. A descriptive correlational design was used for this study, which was framed by the Health Belief Model (1986) and Orem's self-care deficit theory (1985). Participants completed The Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS) (Champion, 1993). This instrument was used to measure susceptibility, seriousness, benefits, barriers, confidence, and general health motivation associated with breast self-examination. Extensive data analysis was performed to determine frequencies and correlation of the research variables of health beliefs, including self-care practices, and the performance of breast self-examination. Kendall's Tau was calculated at 1.000 and was noted to be statistically significant (p = 0.001). The following conclusions for this study were reached based on the data analysis: the majority of nurses in this study did not feel a personal susceptibility to breast cancer; although a majority of nurses (85%) in the study reported that the thought of breast cancer was frightening to them, only 33% reported that they were personally afraid of getting breast cancer; nurses in the study believed that breast self-examination (BSE) is beneficial to early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and that the barriers to BSE are minimal, if any; nurses in the study had gaps in their knowledge/confidence regarding BSE; and nurses in the study want to discover health problems early but often do not follow through with behaviors necessary for discovery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Health Beliefs, Including Self-Care Practices, and the Performance of Breast Self-Examination in Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147773-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Health Beliefs, Including Self-Care Practices, and the Performance of Breast Self-Examination in Registered Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pirkle, L. Darlene, RNC, MSN, CCE, CLC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valdosta State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Ms.</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lpirkle@valdosta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Current estimates indicate that one in eight women will develop breast cancer during their lifetimes according to Breast Cancer Facts and Figures 2004 (American Cancer Society, 2004). Breast self-examination (BSE) is an important screening tool in the early detection and treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship, if any, of health beliefs, including self-care practices, and the performance of breast self-examination in registered nurses employed by a hospital in southern Georgia. A descriptive correlational design was used for this study, which was framed by the Health Belief Model (1986) and Orem's self-care deficit theory (1985). Participants completed The Champion's Health Belief Model Scale (CHBMS) (Champion, 1993). This instrument was used to measure susceptibility, seriousness, benefits, barriers, confidence, and general health motivation associated with breast self-examination. Extensive data analysis was performed to determine frequencies and correlation of the research variables of health beliefs, including self-care practices, and the performance of breast self-examination. Kendall's Tau was calculated at 1.000 and was noted to be statistically significant (p = 0.001). The following conclusions for this study were reached based on the data analysis: the majority of nurses in this study did not feel a personal susceptibility to breast cancer; although a majority of nurses (85%) in the study reported that the thought of breast cancer was frightening to them, only 33% reported that they were personally afraid of getting breast cancer; nurses in the study believed that breast self-examination (BSE) is beneficial to early diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer and that the barriers to BSE are minimal, if any; nurses in the study had gaps in their knowledge/confidence regarding BSE; and nurses in the study want to discover health problems early but often do not follow through with behaviors necessary for discovery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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