Facilitating Acceptance of an Intravenous Safety Needle Device in Healthcare Institutions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147779
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Facilitating Acceptance of an Intravenous Safety Needle Device in Healthcare Institutions
Abstract:
Facilitating Acceptance of an Intravenous Safety Needle Device in Healthcare Institutions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rivers, Dianna Lipp, RN, DrPH, CNAA, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Lamar University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Background: The use of modern safety needles has, in recent years, reduced needlestick injuries to healthcare workers by over half. What, in the nurses' perception, has facilitated their acceptance and use of a safety device? This is an important global issue because needlesticks expose nurses to the danger of HIV, hepatitis C, and other diseases. Safety needle devices substantially prevent this danger, but only if hospitals are successful in implementing their use. Design and Sample: A one-time cross-sectional survey of 742 nurses (620 responding) was conducted in December, 2000 in a 900-bed Texas hospital, with follow-up information obtained in 2005. Variables: Independent variables studied were organizational facilitators, including training and safety climate; individual facilitators studied were experience with the device (time using device and frequency of use) and background information (nursing unit; length of time a nurse in the hospital and total career time). Acceptance, with its dimension of compliance, was an intermediate outcome variable. Perceived changes in needlestick rates was a final outcome variable. Methods: The study was conducted with a self-administered 34-item questionnaire in the hospital that had begun implementation of the device 15 months earlier. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and multiple and logistic regression were utilized in the analysis. Follow-up provided an update on use. Findings: Evidence revealed widespread device acceptance, as predicted by adequate training, appropriate timing between training and use of the device, a favorable safety climate, and a shorter length of service (p<. 05). Compliance was predicted with increased time in using the device, and safety climate. The majority of nurses (86%) always used the device. The majority perceived fewer injuries. Conclusions: Adequate training and favorable safety climate are among the most essential strategic measures for maximizing success in implementing safety needle programs. Implications: Future research to determine applicability of study to other safety devices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFacilitating Acceptance of an Intravenous Safety Needle Device in Healthcare Institutionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147779-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Facilitating Acceptance of an Intravenous Safety Needle Device in Healthcare Institutions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rivers, Dianna Lipp, RN, DrPH, CNAA, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lamar University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">riversdl@hal.lamar.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The use of modern safety needles has, in recent years, reduced needlestick injuries to healthcare workers by over half. What, in the nurses' perception, has facilitated their acceptance and use of a safety device? This is an important global issue because needlesticks expose nurses to the danger of HIV, hepatitis C, and other diseases. Safety needle devices substantially prevent this danger, but only if hospitals are successful in implementing their use. Design and Sample: A one-time cross-sectional survey of 742 nurses (620 responding) was conducted in December, 2000 in a 900-bed Texas hospital, with follow-up information obtained in 2005. Variables: Independent variables studied were organizational facilitators, including training and safety climate; individual facilitators studied were experience with the device (time using device and frequency of use) and background information (nursing unit; length of time a nurse in the hospital and total career time). Acceptance, with its dimension of compliance, was an intermediate outcome variable. Perceived changes in needlestick rates was a final outcome variable. Methods: The study was conducted with a self-administered 34-item questionnaire in the hospital that had begun implementation of the device 15 months earlier. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and multiple and logistic regression were utilized in the analysis. Follow-up provided an update on use. Findings: Evidence revealed widespread device acceptance, as predicted by adequate training, appropriate timing between training and use of the device, a favorable safety climate, and a shorter length of service (p&lt;. 05). Compliance was predicted with increased time in using the device, and safety climate. The majority of nurses (86%) always used the device. The majority perceived fewer injuries. Conclusions: Adequate training and favorable safety climate are among the most essential strategic measures for maximizing success in implementing safety needle programs. Implications: Future research to determine applicability of study to other safety devices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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