Compassion Fatigue Among Nurses: Does Intersubjective Engagement Offer an Explanation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147785
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Compassion Fatigue Among Nurses: Does Intersubjective Engagement Offer an Explanation
Abstract:
Compassion Fatigue Among Nurses: Does Intersubjective Engagement Offer an Explanation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Sabo, Brenda Marie, RN, BA, MA, PhD(student)
P.I. Institution Name:Capital District Health Authority
Title:Professional Practice Leader
Working in emotionally charged environments such as intensive care, emergency, mental health (including crisis), and oncology units can be expected to carry considerable stress for staff. Staff is repeatedly exposed to patient experiences of trauma, suffering, life-threatening illness and/or therapies that may prove ineffective. Providing care to individuals whose stories are ones of fear, pain and suffering carries a cost. Nurses who have an enormous capacity for empathy are most vulnerable themselves to experiencing health problems such as compassion fatigue. The following discussion will draw on the ethical dialectic of Sally Gadow (with its triad of levels: subjective immersion (ethical immediacy), objective detachment (ethical universalism), and inter-subjective engagement (relational narrative) seeking to position this framework as a possible explanation for the emergence of a phenomenon associated with the ?natural' consequences of caring.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCompassion Fatigue Among Nurses: Does Intersubjective Engagement Offer an Explanationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147785-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Compassion Fatigue Among Nurses: Does Intersubjective Engagement Offer an Explanation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sabo, Brenda Marie, RN, BA, MA, PhD(student)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Capital District Health Authority</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professional Practice Leader</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Brenda.Sabo@cdha.nshealth.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Working in emotionally charged environments such as intensive care, emergency, mental health (including crisis), and oncology units can be expected to carry considerable stress for staff. Staff is repeatedly exposed to patient experiences of trauma, suffering, life-threatening illness and/or therapies that may prove ineffective. Providing care to individuals whose stories are ones of fear, pain and suffering carries a cost. Nurses who have an enormous capacity for empathy are most vulnerable themselves to experiencing health problems such as compassion fatigue. The following discussion will draw on the ethical dialectic of Sally Gadow (with its triad of levels: subjective immersion (ethical immediacy), objective detachment (ethical universalism), and inter-subjective engagement (relational narrative) seeking to position this framework as a possible explanation for the emergence of a phenomenon associated with the ?natural' consequences of caring.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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