2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147792
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Transition of New Graduate Nurses Into the Workplace
Abstract:
The Transition of New Graduate Nurses Into the Workplace
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Scott, Elaine S., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:East Carolina University
Title:THE TRANSITION OF NEW GRADUATE NURSES INTO THE WORKPLACE
The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of anticipatory socialization (age, race, marital status, and educational preparation) and organizational socialization (orientation, continuing education, staffing shortages, and patient caseload) on job and career satisfaction, intent to leave the current position, intent to leave nursing profession, and turnover. The study was a secondary analysis of an existing database of new graduate nurses generated by the N. C. Center for Nursing in 2001. The study sample consisted of 329 new graduate registered nurses working fulltime for less than two years. The study found that turnover during the first two years of practice for the new graduate nurse was strongly associated with the length and quality of orientation. Although the study found a relationship between job and career satisfaction, the findings suggest that these are two distinct components of nurse satisfaction. The daily experience of short staffing during the first few years of practice is associated with job dissatisfaction and job dissatisfaction is related to dissatisfaction with the career of nursing and the intention to leave the job and the profession earlier. This study has implications for educators and administrators of health care organizations. High quality orientation programs, adequate nurse/patient staffing rations, and an adequate period for transition from school-to-work are critical components for retaining and fostering competence in new graduate nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Transition of New Graduate Nurses Into the Workplaceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147792-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Transition of New Graduate Nurses Into the Workplace</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Scott, Elaine S., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">East Carolina University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">THE TRANSITION OF NEW GRADUATE NURSES INTO THE WORKPLACE</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">elainescott@charter.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of anticipatory socialization (age, race, marital status, and educational preparation) and organizational socialization (orientation, continuing education, staffing shortages, and patient caseload) on job and career satisfaction, intent to leave the current position, intent to leave nursing profession, and turnover. The study was a secondary analysis of an existing database of new graduate nurses generated by the N. C. Center for Nursing in 2001. The study sample consisted of 329 new graduate registered nurses working fulltime for less than two years. The study found that turnover during the first two years of practice for the new graduate nurse was strongly associated with the length and quality of orientation. Although the study found a relationship between job and career satisfaction, the findings suggest that these are two distinct components of nurse satisfaction. The daily experience of short staffing during the first few years of practice is associated with job dissatisfaction and job dissatisfaction is related to dissatisfaction with the career of nursing and the intention to leave the job and the profession earlier. This study has implications for educators and administrators of health care organizations. High quality orientation programs, adequate nurse/patient staffing rations, and an adequate period for transition from school-to-work are critical components for retaining and fostering competence in new graduate nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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