2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147794
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing's Role in Creating Women's Work
Abstract:
Nursing's Role in Creating Women's Work
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Selanders, Louise C., EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Associate Professor
Significant cultural and social change occurred in England in the mid- and latter nineteenth century. As part of the social fabric, modern nursing also experienced major evolution, moving nurses from the status of charwoman to educated professional. However, little research has examined nursing's role as a significant player in helping women make the transition from keeper of the hearth to remunerated health care provider. New documents have been identified which indicate that nursing was a transitional role player in helping women to emerge from the home to the workplace. Secondary documents were utilized to establish the sociological constraints and expectations of the female gender role in mid- and latter nineteenth century England. A content analysis was conducted on the primary documents. The preliminary analysis of these documents finds that policies were effective which utilized issues of class, social order, women's education, discipline, morality and traditional women's roles to establish an effective care base within the evolving institution of the hospital. The first generation of nursing reformers including Nightingale, Twining and Lees used these same characteristics to place nursing in a unique position to effect change in the role of women as workers. These strategies appear to be a transitional key which helped to change single women from the role of redundancy and precarious existence to educated and productive positions. This raises further issues as to how nursing made use of this position of power and whether or not the profession has continued to develop a social power base.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing's Role in Creating Women's Worken_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147794-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing's Role in Creating Women's Work</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Selanders, Louise C., EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">selander@msu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Significant cultural and social change occurred in England in the mid- and latter nineteenth century. As part of the social fabric, modern nursing also experienced major evolution, moving nurses from the status of charwoman to educated professional. However, little research has examined nursing's role as a significant player in helping women make the transition from keeper of the hearth to remunerated health care provider. New documents have been identified which indicate that nursing was a transitional role player in helping women to emerge from the home to the workplace. Secondary documents were utilized to establish the sociological constraints and expectations of the female gender role in mid- and latter nineteenth century England. A content analysis was conducted on the primary documents. The preliminary analysis of these documents finds that policies were effective which utilized issues of class, social order, women's education, discipline, morality and traditional women's roles to establish an effective care base within the evolving institution of the hospital. The first generation of nursing reformers including Nightingale, Twining and Lees used these same characteristics to place nursing in a unique position to effect change in the role of women as workers. These strategies appear to be a transitional key which helped to change single women from the role of redundancy and precarious existence to educated and productive positions. This raises further issues as to how nursing made use of this position of power and whether or not the profession has continued to develop a social power base.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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