Ethical Problems of Nursing Education Research in Japan: A Trend Over 15 Years

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147810
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethical Problems of Nursing Education Research in Japan: A Trend Over 15 Years
Abstract:
Ethical Problems of Nursing Education Research in Japan: A Trend Over 15 Years
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tsukamoto, Tomoe, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Chiba University
Title:Student of Doctoral Program in Nursing
Co-Authors:Naomi Funashima, RN, DNSc; Hiroe Miura, RN, DNSc; Yuriko Nomoto, RN, DNSc
Aim: To examine ethical problems of research in nursing education. Method: Research abstracts concerning nursing education were collected from the 1999-2003 proceedings from five major Japanese nursing academic societies.2153 abstracts were analyzed using a format that consisted of research objective, method, ethical problems and so on. Ethical problems were analyzed based on the following points: 1) the participants' consent, 2) anonymity of participants, 3) the compelling force on data collection, and 4) the burden of data offering. During the analyzing process, several meetings were held to enhance the validity of each judgment. Findings: The following points became clear as a result of comparing this study with our previous study that analyzed research in nursing education from 1989 to 1998. 1) The ratio of research with no ethical problems had increased. 2) The ratio of research clearly mentioning participants' consent had increased. 3) The ratio of research having the possibility that compelling force acted on data collection had increased. Compelling force may exist in the research that has no indication of the data collection rate or has a high data collection rate. 4) The ratio of research that did not keep the anonymity of the participants had increased, in that it clearly mentioned the name of the educational institution of the subjects. Conclusion: This study indicated the possibility that voluntary participation was not substantially guaranteed even if the researcher received the participants' consent. In addition, it indicated a problem that the consciousness of a researcher in regards to anonymity was not sufficient.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthical Problems of Nursing Education Research in Japan: A Trend Over 15 Yearsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147810-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ethical Problems of Nursing Education Research in Japan: A Trend Over 15 Years</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsukamoto, Tomoe, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chiba University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Student of Doctoral Program in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tomopen@graduate.chiba-u.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Naomi Funashima, RN, DNSc; Hiroe Miura, RN, DNSc; Yuriko Nomoto, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aim: To examine ethical problems of research in nursing education. Method: Research abstracts concerning nursing education were collected from the 1999-2003 proceedings from five major Japanese nursing academic societies.2153 abstracts were analyzed using a format that consisted of research objective, method, ethical problems and so on. Ethical problems were analyzed based on the following points: 1) the participants' consent, 2) anonymity of participants, 3) the compelling force on data collection, and 4) the burden of data offering. During the analyzing process, several meetings were held to enhance the validity of each judgment. Findings: The following points became clear as a result of comparing this study with our previous study that analyzed research in nursing education from 1989 to 1998. 1) The ratio of research with no ethical problems had increased. 2) The ratio of research clearly mentioning participants' consent had increased. 3) The ratio of research having the possibility that compelling force acted on data collection had increased. Compelling force may exist in the research that has no indication of the data collection rate or has a high data collection rate. 4) The ratio of research that did not keep the anonymity of the participants had increased, in that it clearly mentioned the name of the educational institution of the subjects. Conclusion: This study indicated the possibility that voluntary participation was not substantially guaranteed even if the researcher received the participants' consent. In addition, it indicated a problem that the consciousness of a researcher in regards to anonymity was not sufficient.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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