The Effects of a Creative-Arts Intervention on Depression and Quality of Life in Family Caregivers During Patient Treatment for Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147813
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of a Creative-Arts Intervention on Depression and Quality of Life in Family Caregivers During Patient Treatment for Cancer
Abstract:
The Effects of a Creative-Arts Intervention on Depression and Quality of Life in Family Caregivers During Patient Treatment for Cancer
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Walsh, Sandra M., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Barry University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:R. Sue Radcliffe, MA; Lynette Huber, BA
Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to measure the effects of a Creative-Arts Intervention (CAI) on depression and quality of life of family caregivers of patients with cancer. Hogan's end-of-life framework (Walsh & Weiss, 2003) describes family processes and difficulties following patient diagnosis and during treatment. Family caregivers are depressed and have poor quality of life when a family member is undergoing treatment for cancer. The CAI was offered to family caregivers to provide relief from depression and to promote quality of life. Previous investigations supported the efficacy of the CAI (Walsh, Martin, & Schmidt, 2004). Methods: A pre-post test quasi-experimental design was utilized to measure depression and quality of life in a convenience sample of family caregivers serving as their own controls. Caregivers were enrolled ?at the bedside?. Demographic information and pre-tests were administered prior to the CAI. The CAI consisted of variety of art-making/crafts activities to be completed at the patient's bedside. The caregiver in consultation with the patient chose activities to complete either together or separately (depending on the patient's interest and condition). The CAI interventionist instructed the participant and was available to assist throughout the process. Within three weeks, caregivers completed a brief interview and post-tests via telephone. Findings: Depression was lowered (p Discussion: Additional follow up to determine lasting effects of art-making is warranted. A control group is also needed to compare effects between groups that receive the CAI and those that do not. Nurses can offer leadership to establish innovative programs at the bedside to promote quality of life during patient treatment. Nurses are in key positions to encourage family and patient participation in such programs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of a Creative-Arts Intervention on Depression and Quality of Life in Family Caregivers During Patient Treatment for Canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147813-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of a Creative-Arts Intervention on Depression and Quality of Life in Family Caregivers During Patient Treatment for Cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walsh, Sandra M., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Barry University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">swalsh@mail.barry.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R. Sue Radcliffe, MA; Lynette Huber, BA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to measure the effects of a Creative-Arts Intervention (CAI) on depression and quality of life of family caregivers of patients with cancer. Hogan's end-of-life framework (Walsh &amp; Weiss, 2003) describes family processes and difficulties following patient diagnosis and during treatment. Family caregivers are depressed and have poor quality of life when a family member is undergoing treatment for cancer. The CAI was offered to family caregivers to provide relief from depression and to promote quality of life. Previous investigations supported the efficacy of the CAI (Walsh, Martin, &amp; Schmidt, 2004). Methods: A pre-post test quasi-experimental design was utilized to measure depression and quality of life in a convenience sample of family caregivers serving as their own controls. Caregivers were enrolled ?at the bedside?. Demographic information and pre-tests were administered prior to the CAI. The CAI consisted of variety of art-making/crafts activities to be completed at the patient's bedside. The caregiver in consultation with the patient chose activities to complete either together or separately (depending on the patient's interest and condition). The CAI interventionist instructed the participant and was available to assist throughout the process. Within three weeks, caregivers completed a brief interview and post-tests via telephone. Findings: Depression was lowered (p Discussion: Additional follow up to determine lasting effects of art-making is warranted. A control group is also needed to compare effects between groups that receive the CAI and those that do not. Nurses can offer leadership to establish innovative programs at the bedside to promote quality of life during patient treatment. Nurses are in key positions to encourage family and patient participation in such programs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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