2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147833
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Well-Being in Refugee Women
Abstract:
Well-Being in Refugee Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Baird, Martha, MN, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:William Jewell College
Title:Assistant Professor of nursing
[Scientific session research presentation] Purpose: This study will present preliminary findings from a study of how Sudanese refugee women maintain well-being during the transition to a new country. The study will focus on the affect culture has on well-being. Background: Out of the estimated 20.8 displaced persons, worldwide in the year 2005, 8.5 million of these are identified as refugees. The majority of refugees are women and children. Most of the literature about refugee women focuses on physical concerns and psychological responses to trauma. Very little is known about what factors influence and contribute to well-being and how refugee women make healthy transitions to a country of resettlement. Theoretical background: The Theory of Transitions is used as a framework to explore the situational transition of forced migration. Personal factors such as cultural beliefs and practices, religion and community factors such as social support and advocacy are identified to evaluate how these factors affect a healthy transition. Methods: The study uses ethnographic methods, specifically demographic questionnaire, observation participation, and three individual in-depth semi-structured interviews with each woman. Data were analyzed for recurrent themes, patterns, and linkages associated with the maintenance of health and prevention of illness during transition. Sample: A sample of 10-12 adult women from Sudan (Dinka tribe) who migrated to the U.S. with children under refugee status were recruited for this study. The Catholic Charities Refugee Resettlement Program in Kansas City, Kansas is the site used for recruitment. Significance: This study will provide a theoretical foundation to guide nurses in the development of culturally relevant interventions to facilitate well-being and healthy transitions for Sudanese refugee women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWell-Being in Refugee Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147833-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Well-Being in Refugee Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baird, Martha, MN, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">William Jewell College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bairdm@william.jewell.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Purpose: This study will present preliminary findings from a study of how Sudanese refugee women maintain well-being during the transition to a new country. The study will focus on the affect culture has on well-being. Background: Out of the estimated 20.8 displaced persons, worldwide in the year 2005, 8.5 million of these are identified as refugees. The majority of refugees are women and children. Most of the literature about refugee women focuses on physical concerns and psychological responses to trauma. Very little is known about what factors influence and contribute to well-being and how refugee women make healthy transitions to a country of resettlement. Theoretical background: The Theory of Transitions is used as a framework to explore the situational transition of forced migration. Personal factors such as cultural beliefs and practices, religion and community factors such as social support and advocacy are identified to evaluate how these factors affect a healthy transition. Methods: The study uses ethnographic methods, specifically demographic questionnaire, observation participation, and three individual in-depth semi-structured interviews with each woman. Data were analyzed for recurrent themes, patterns, and linkages associated with the maintenance of health and prevention of illness during transition. Sample: A sample of 10-12 adult women from Sudan (Dinka tribe) who migrated to the U.S. with children under refugee status were recruited for this study. The Catholic Charities Refugee Resettlement Program in Kansas City, Kansas is the site used for recruitment. Significance: This study will provide a theoretical foundation to guide nurses in the development of culturally relevant interventions to facilitate well-being and healthy transitions for Sudanese refugee women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:36:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:36:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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