Improving Student Outcomes: Shifting the Focus from Teaching to Learning

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147839
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Student Outcomes: Shifting the Focus from Teaching to Learning
Abstract:
Improving Student Outcomes: Shifting the Focus from Teaching to Learning
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Bloom, Kathaleen C., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Florida
Title:Associate Professor and Prelicensure Coordinator
[Scientific session research presentation] Changes in nursing education are not easy for either faculty or students. This is especially true when the change results in dissonance. This study examined the effects of a change in an undergraduate health assessment course from a standard lecture-lab format to a format using faculty-designed self-directed learning modules combined with faculty-facilitated laboratory practice sessions. The focus, then, shifted from an emphasis on "teaching" (faculty-focused) to one of "learning" (student-focused). The dissonance lies between faculty and student expectations of their respective roles in the teaching-learning process. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: 1) examine student outcomes associated with the change, 2) examine student attitudes toward self-directed learning, and 3) examine advantages and disadvantages of the change from the faculty perspective. Method: This was a Level II design comparing quiz averages, final exam grades, practical (walk-through) performance and course evaluations from 8 cohorts taught in the new format (n=428) with those of the previous 8 cohorts taught in the traditional format (n=312). Focus groups with students and interviews with clinical faculty were also held. Results: Student outcomes were as good or better for those in the self-directed format. Initial differences in student course evaluations have again risen to their previous levels over time. Student discussions revealed positive and negative perceptions of self-directed learning. Clinical faculty are greatly satisfied with the outcomes and believe that clinical assessment skills and critical thinking are more advanced with students taught in the self-directed format. Conclusions: This self-directed, student-focused teaching-learning format had a positive effect on student outcomes in both the short and long-term. Initial negative effects on faculty and course evaluations turned around as faculty became more comfortable and competent with the self-directed modality and, perhaps more importantly, better at articulating the way the course operates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Student Outcomes: Shifting the Focus from Teaching to Learningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147839-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Student Outcomes: Shifting the Focus from Teaching to Learning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bloom, Kathaleen C., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Prelicensure Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kbloom@unf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Changes in nursing education are not easy for either faculty or students. This is especially true when the change results in dissonance. This study examined the effects of a change in an undergraduate health assessment course from a standard lecture-lab format to a format using faculty-designed self-directed learning modules combined with faculty-facilitated laboratory practice sessions. The focus, then, shifted from an emphasis on &quot;teaching&quot; (faculty-focused) to one of &quot;learning&quot; (student-focused). The dissonance lies between faculty and student expectations of their respective roles in the teaching-learning process. Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: 1) examine student outcomes associated with the change, 2) examine student attitudes toward self-directed learning, and 3) examine advantages and disadvantages of the change from the faculty perspective. Method: This was a Level II design comparing quiz averages, final exam grades, practical (walk-through) performance and course evaluations from 8 cohorts taught in the new format (n=428) with those of the previous 8 cohorts taught in the traditional format (n=312). Focus groups with students and interviews with clinical faculty were also held. Results: Student outcomes were as good or better for those in the self-directed format. Initial differences in student course evaluations have again risen to their previous levels over time. Student discussions revealed positive and negative perceptions of self-directed learning. Clinical faculty are greatly satisfied with the outcomes and believe that clinical assessment skills and critical thinking are more advanced with students taught in the self-directed format. Conclusions: This self-directed, student-focused teaching-learning format had a positive effect on student outcomes in both the short and long-term. Initial negative effects on faculty and course evaluations turned around as faculty became more comfortable and competent with the self-directed modality and, perhaps more importantly, better at articulating the way the course operates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:37:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:37:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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