Using the Internet in Delivering a Nursing Intervention to Build Hope

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147854
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using the Internet in Delivering a Nursing Intervention to Build Hope
Abstract:
Using the Internet in Delivering a Nursing Intervention to Build Hope
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Cantrell, Mary Ann, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Villanova University
Title:Associate Professor
[Scientific session research presentation] Researchers have begun to recognize the need for using technology to meet the long-term needs of childhood cancer survivors (Dalton, 2005). For those interested in studying survivors of childhood cancer, who are not easily accessible in sufficient numbers to conduct on-site or even limited-site studies, web-based methods are an effective means in obtaining useful information and delivering interventions (Hinds, Burghen, Haase, & Phillips, 2006). Non-experimental web-based studies have received the most attention, but Internet based clinical trials are now considered feasible (McAlindon, Formica, Kabbara, LaValley, &, Lehmer, 2006). Computer-based interventions can address the issues such as geographic distant locations and travel time that often limit subjects? participation in research (Hill, Weinert, & Cudney, 2006). Web cameras can be an effective medium for the delivery of clinical psychosocial nursing interventions that allow for real time interaction among a group of individuals. These on-line interactions include verbal and nonverbal exchanges that are essential in human-to-human interaction to build global networks and communities among and between patients and researchers. Interventions to foster and build hope require intimate, meaningful human-to-human interaction. The intervention that was pilot tested used an on-line, small group interactional format to foster and promote hope among early female survivors of childhood cancer. The intervention is composed of eight, two-hour sessions, each with a specific focus, goals, and activities that offer opportunities for participants to share and discuss issues of importance to them. The purpose of this presentation is to report the feasibility and overall experiences in the delivery of this on-line nursing intervention. The presentation will include information and reflection on the preparation process for the delivery of the intervention, issues and barriers in its delivery, and positive and negative experiences in using on-line technology among participants that include quantitative and descriptive data.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing the Internet in Delivering a Nursing Intervention to Build Hopeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147854-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using the Internet in Delivering a Nursing Intervention to Build Hope</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cantrell, Mary Ann, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Villanova University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.ann.cantrell@villanova.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Scientific session research presentation] Researchers have begun to recognize the need for using technology to meet the long-term needs of childhood cancer survivors (Dalton, 2005). For those interested in studying survivors of childhood cancer, who are not easily accessible in sufficient numbers to conduct on-site or even limited-site studies, web-based methods are an effective means in obtaining useful information and delivering interventions (Hinds, Burghen, Haase, &amp; Phillips, 2006). Non-experimental web-based studies have received the most attention, but Internet based clinical trials are now considered feasible (McAlindon, Formica, Kabbara, LaValley, &amp;, Lehmer, 2006). Computer-based interventions can address the issues such as geographic distant locations and travel time that often limit subjects? participation in research (Hill, Weinert, &amp; Cudney, 2006). Web cameras can be an effective medium for the delivery of clinical psychosocial nursing interventions that allow for real time interaction among a group of individuals. These on-line interactions include verbal and nonverbal exchanges that are essential in human-to-human interaction to build global networks and communities among and between patients and researchers. Interventions to foster and build hope require intimate, meaningful human-to-human interaction. The intervention that was pilot tested used an on-line, small group interactional format to foster and promote hope among early female survivors of childhood cancer. The intervention is composed of eight, two-hour sessions, each with a specific focus, goals, and activities that offer opportunities for participants to share and discuss issues of importance to them. The purpose of this presentation is to report the feasibility and overall experiences in the delivery of this on-line nursing intervention. The presentation will include information and reflection on the preparation process for the delivery of the intervention, issues and barriers in its delivery, and positive and negative experiences in using on-line technology among participants that include quantitative and descriptive data.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:37:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:37:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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