Is conscientious objection a potential response to technological, life-extending treatments at the end of life which cause suffering rather than offering comfort and dignity?

24.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147858
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is conscientious objection a potential response to technological, life-extending treatments at the end of life which cause suffering rather than offering comfort and dignity?
Abstract:
Is conscientious objection a potential response to technological, life-extending treatments at the end of life which cause suffering rather than offering comfort and dignity?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Catlin, Anita J., DNSc, FNP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Sonoma State University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing, Ethics Consultant
Co-Authors:Deborah Volat, Certified, Midwife
[Symposium scientific presentation] The most frequently reported cause of moral distress in nursing is following orders to support patients with advanced technology at the end of their lives when palliative or comfort care would be more humane. Nurses report that they feel they are harming patients or causing suffering when they could be comforting instead. A university research team spent a year looking at moral distress and futility, as well as constructing a concept analysis of conscientious objection by nurses as a response to advanced technological interventions for the dying patient. After exploration of the concept of conscientious objection, the team created a pilot survey study to ask for clinical verification of the concept?s use, per the Schwartz Barcott (2002) method. 67 NICU and PICU nurses reported high interest in conscientious objection as a method of being able to live within their own moral frameworks.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs conscientious objection a potential response to technological, life-extending treatments at the end of life which cause suffering rather than offering comfort and dignity?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147858-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is conscientious objection a potential response to technological, life-extending treatments at the end of life which cause suffering rather than offering comfort and dignity?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Catlin, Anita J., DNSc, FNP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sonoma State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing, Ethics Consultant</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">catlin@sonoma.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Volat, Certified, Midwife</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium scientific presentation] The most frequently reported cause of moral distress in nursing is following orders to support patients with advanced technology at the end of their lives when palliative or comfort care would be more humane. Nurses report that they feel they are harming patients or causing suffering when they could be comforting instead. A university research team spent a year looking at moral distress and futility, as well as constructing a concept analysis of conscientious objection by nurses as a response to advanced technological interventions for the dying patient. After exploration of the concept of conscientious objection, the team created a pilot survey study to ask for clinical verification of the concept?s use, per the Schwartz Barcott (2002) method. 67 NICU and PICU nurses reported high interest in conscientious objection as a method of being able to live within their own moral frameworks.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:37:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:37:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.