Caregiving of African-American Daughters: Applying Neuman's Systems Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147886
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregiving of African-American Daughters: Applying Neuman's Systems Model
Abstract:
Caregiving of African-American Daughters: Applying Neuman's Systems Model
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Cannon, Sheila, PhD, APRN, PMH, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Hampton University - College of Virginia Beach
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
ABSTRACT Caregiving of African-American Daughters: Applying Neuman's Systems Model Women, primarily adult daughters, provide most of the caregiving (Family Caregiving Alliance, 2004). African-American caregivers are more likely than other groups to report serious health care problems in their care recipients, which add to the demands of their responsibilities (Schreiber, 2002). In addition, a higher proportion of African-American caregivers reported having suffered physical and mental problems because of caregiving (U.S. Administration on Aging, 2004). Therefore, it is imperative to study caregiving of African-American daughters. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the caregiving experiences of African-American daughters who have functioned as caregivers. The Neuman Systems Model was utilized as the framework for this study (Neuman, 1989; Neuman & Fawcett, 2002), and focus group data revealed caregiving had spiritual, cultural, and individual meanings. African-American daughters viewed caregiving as an act of kindness, love, and devotion; however, they were stressed and felt tense in their role as caregivers because of the increased demands that had been placed on them. Caregiving was also viewed as a familial responsibility. Focus group data indicated that religion was instrumental in assisting African-Americans to cope with caregiving because emotional strain was often relieved through prayer, reading scripture, and performing other actions that showed their faith. The overload data from the survey confirmed that African-American daughters were tired and overwhelmed by the caregiving experience. However, they possessed strength, self-confidence, and caregiving mastery. This study concluded that religion gave most participants a strong tolerance for the caregiving situation and served to mediate the caregiving strain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregiving of African-American Daughters: Applying Neuman's Systems Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147886-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Caregiving of African-American Daughters: Applying Neuman's Systems Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cannon, Sheila, PhD, APRN, PMH, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hampton University - College of Virginia Beach</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sheila.cannon@hamptonu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">ABSTRACT Caregiving of African-American Daughters: Applying Neuman's Systems Model Women, primarily adult daughters, provide most of the caregiving (Family Caregiving Alliance, 2004). African-American caregivers are more likely than other groups to report serious health care problems in their care recipients, which add to the demands of their responsibilities (Schreiber, 2002). In addition, a higher proportion of African-American caregivers reported having suffered physical and mental problems because of caregiving (U.S. Administration on Aging, 2004). Therefore, it is imperative to study caregiving of African-American daughters. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the caregiving experiences of African-American daughters who have functioned as caregivers. The Neuman Systems Model was utilized as the framework for this study (Neuman, 1989; Neuman &amp; Fawcett, 2002), and focus group data revealed caregiving had spiritual, cultural, and individual meanings. African-American daughters viewed caregiving as an act of kindness, love, and devotion; however, they were stressed and felt tense in their role as caregivers because of the increased demands that had been placed on them. Caregiving was also viewed as a familial responsibility. Focus group data indicated that religion was instrumental in assisting African-Americans to cope with caregiving because emotional strain was often relieved through prayer, reading scripture, and performing other actions that showed their faith. The overload data from the survey confirmed that African-American daughters were tired and overwhelmed by the caregiving experience. However, they possessed strength, self-confidence, and caregiving mastery. This study concluded that religion gave most participants a strong tolerance for the caregiving situation and served to mediate the caregiving strain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:37:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:37:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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