Critical Caring: The Dialectic of Meeting the Needs and Building the Capacity of Communities and Their Members

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147914
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Caring: The Dialectic of Meeting the Needs and Building the Capacity of Communities and Their Members
Abstract:
Critical Caring: The Dialectic of Meeting the Needs and Building the Capacity of Communities and Their Members
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Falk-Rafael, Adeline, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:York University
Title:Associate Professor
Critical caring has been proposed as a mid-range theory for public health nursing, building on nursing science and critical feminist theories. It identifies 7 core carative health promoting processes that together provide a framework for holistic nursing care. As such, it has the potential to root practice in an expanded nursing caring science that re-incorporates the social justice agenda characteristic of Nightingale and early nursing leaders. After providing a brief overview of the theory, this paper will focus on one of the theory's seven core carative health promoting processes: meeting the needs and building the capacity of communities and their members. The two aspects of this process demonstrate the synchronous relationship between advocacy and empowerment identified in the literature. The carative process builds on nursing research findings that empowerment, in public health nursing practice, occurs within the context of a trusting relationship, characterized by mutuality, that develops as nurses engage with clients to assist them in meeting their needs. This paper will provide a synthesis of literature and empirical evidence of public health nurses' roles in meeting the needs and building capacity of: (a) individuals and families , (b) vulnerable populations, such as survivors of mental illness, homeless persons, and other socially excluded groups, and (c) communities and aggregates in specific settings, such as schools, workplaces, and rural localities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Caring: The Dialectic of Meeting the Needs and Building the Capacity of Communities and Their Membersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147914-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical Caring: The Dialectic of Meeting the Needs and Building the Capacity of Communities and Their Members</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Falk-Rafael, Adeline, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">York University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">afalk-rafael@rogers.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Critical caring has been proposed as a mid-range theory for public health nursing, building on nursing science and critical feminist theories. It identifies 7 core carative health promoting processes that together provide a framework for holistic nursing care. As such, it has the potential to root practice in an expanded nursing caring science that re-incorporates the social justice agenda characteristic of Nightingale and early nursing leaders. After providing a brief overview of the theory, this paper will focus on one of the theory's seven core carative health promoting processes: meeting the needs and building the capacity of communities and their members. The two aspects of this process demonstrate the synchronous relationship between advocacy and empowerment identified in the literature. The carative process builds on nursing research findings that empowerment, in public health nursing practice, occurs within the context of a trusting relationship, characterized by mutuality, that develops as nurses engage with clients to assist them in meeting their needs. This paper will provide a synthesis of literature and empirical evidence of public health nurses' roles in meeting the needs and building capacity of: (a) individuals and families , (b) vulnerable populations, such as survivors of mental illness, homeless persons, and other socially excluded groups, and (c) communities and aggregates in specific settings, such as schools, workplaces, and rural localities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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