Interdisciplinary Collaborative Problem-Based Learning Among Nursing and Pharmacy Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147944
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interdisciplinary Collaborative Problem-Based Learning Among Nursing and Pharmacy Students
Abstract:
Interdisciplinary Collaborative Problem-Based Learning Among Nursing and Pharmacy Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hodges, Helen F., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Mercer University
Title:Professional Resilience, Career Longevity, and Parse?s Theory for Baccalaureate Education
New health professionals are expected to work on interdisciplinary teams, but rarely learn such skills in academe. Using an experimental design and an interdisciplinary problem-based learning case-study, the effectiveness of learning was studied in single-discipline (pharmacy-only or nursing-only), interdisciplinary (pharmacy and nursing) small groups, and a control group three separate times between the schools of nursing and pharmacy on one university campus. Student learning was assessed using a multiple-choice quiz and student self assessment of satisfaction and knowledge using a Likert scale. Peer evaluation of critical thinking was assessed using Critical Thinking Indicators (CTI). Analysis was undertaken using descriptive statistics. There were no differences between learning as measured by quiz performance between small group participants and control participants, or between single-discipline and interdisciplinary small groups. However, students self-assessed their knowledge of patient care more positively than their knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Critical thinking assessment was inconclusive. Student satisfaction was generally high related to group study, and with interdisciplinary group study in particular. Findings contribute to evidence-based teaching learning supporting previous findings that collaborative learning is at least as effective as traditional teaching lectures. However, student satisfaction within interdisciplinary groups provide new evidence that collaborative interdisciplinary learning is a useful paradigm that may contribute to students in their preparation for interdisciplinary work in the practice setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterdisciplinary Collaborative Problem-Based Learning Among Nursing and Pharmacy Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147944-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interdisciplinary Collaborative Problem-Based Learning Among Nursing and Pharmacy Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hodges, Helen F., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mercer University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professional Resilience, Career Longevity, and Parse?s Theory for Baccalaureate Education</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hodges_hf@mercer.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">New health professionals are expected to work on interdisciplinary teams, but rarely learn such skills in academe. Using an experimental design and an interdisciplinary problem-based learning case-study, the effectiveness of learning was studied in single-discipline (pharmacy-only or nursing-only), interdisciplinary (pharmacy and nursing) small groups, and a control group three separate times between the schools of nursing and pharmacy on one university campus. Student learning was assessed using a multiple-choice quiz and student self assessment of satisfaction and knowledge using a Likert scale. Peer evaluation of critical thinking was assessed using Critical Thinking Indicators (CTI). Analysis was undertaken using descriptive statistics. There were no differences between learning as measured by quiz performance between small group participants and control participants, or between single-discipline and interdisciplinary small groups. However, students self-assessed their knowledge of patient care more positively than their knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Critical thinking assessment was inconclusive. Student satisfaction was generally high related to group study, and with interdisciplinary group study in particular. Findings contribute to evidence-based teaching learning supporting previous findings that collaborative learning is at least as effective as traditional teaching lectures. However, student satisfaction within interdisciplinary groups provide new evidence that collaborative interdisciplinary learning is a useful paradigm that may contribute to students in their preparation for interdisciplinary work in the practice setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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