Cultural Issues and Theory Application in Chinese-Americans' End-of-Life Treatment Decision-Making

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147945
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Issues and Theory Application in Chinese-Americans' End-of-Life Treatment Decision-Making
Abstract:
Cultural Issues and Theory Application in Chinese-Americans' End-of-Life Treatment Decision-Making
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hsiung, Yi-Fang Yvonne, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Co-Authors:Carol Estwing Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN
As the U.S. society becomes ethnically diverse and increasingly aged, this demographical change poses a challenge for health care professionals of all ethnic backgrounds. In the area of palliative care, since in the United States the concept of "End-of-life (EOL) treatment decision making" is Western oriented, it is unsurprising to discover that Chinese Americans, one of the largest American subpopulations, their EOL attitudes and preferences are distinct from legal standards set by and for European Americans. Chinese Americans' EOL care is found compromised under this Euro-American health care context. However, there has been very limited research addressing this issue and previous studies were not theory-based, either. Given that underlying factors influencing the decision-making behavior have not been thoroughly explored, Chinese Americans' attitudes and preferences toward life-sustaining treatment (LST) such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilator, and tube feeding, remain unclear. This on-going project has two foci: a) to explore traditional cultural factors that fundamentally shape Chinese Americans' view of death, and b) to apply a behavioral theory, Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) (Ajzen, 1991) in charactering the behavior in question. Numerous cultural factors have been found, including Confucian ethics, family concept, collectivism, physician/male paternalism, filial piety, death taboo, and a Chinese view of good death. Together they explain why in general Chinese Americans are less in control, have reservations on discussing death, and favor LST. The TPB chosen from multiple health behavioral theories best characterizes the phenomena of our interest. This project will expand the knowledge base of Chinese Americans' view of death and dying, and ultimately helps to improve Chinese Americans' quality of life at the EOL. Information provided here will also be helpful to non-Chinese-background health caregivers who have interests in providing cultural competent EOL care. There is a potential to alleviate health disparities of this specific cultural group.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Issues and Theory Application in Chinese-Americans' End-of-Life Treatment Decision-Makingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147945-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Issues and Theory Application in Chinese-Americans' End-of-Life Treatment Decision-Making</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hsiung, Yi-Fang Yvonne, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yhsiun1@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Estwing Ferrans, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">As the U.S. society becomes ethnically diverse and increasingly aged, this demographical change poses a challenge for health care professionals of all ethnic backgrounds. In the area of palliative care, since in the United States the concept of &quot;End-of-life (EOL) treatment decision making&quot; is Western oriented, it is unsurprising to discover that Chinese Americans, one of the largest American subpopulations, their EOL attitudes and preferences are distinct from legal standards set by and for European Americans. Chinese Americans' EOL care is found compromised under this Euro-American health care context. However, there has been very limited research addressing this issue and previous studies were not theory-based, either. Given that underlying factors influencing the decision-making behavior have not been thoroughly explored, Chinese Americans' attitudes and preferences toward life-sustaining treatment (LST) such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilator, and tube feeding, remain unclear. This on-going project has two foci: a) to explore traditional cultural factors that fundamentally shape Chinese Americans' view of death, and b) to apply a behavioral theory, Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) (Ajzen, 1991) in charactering the behavior in question. Numerous cultural factors have been found, including Confucian ethics, family concept, collectivism, physician/male paternalism, filial piety, death taboo, and a Chinese view of good death. Together they explain why in general Chinese Americans are less in control, have reservations on discussing death, and favor LST. The TPB chosen from multiple health behavioral theories best characterizes the phenomena of our interest. This project will expand the knowledge base of Chinese Americans' view of death and dying, and ultimately helps to improve Chinese Americans' quality of life at the EOL. Information provided here will also be helpful to non-Chinese-background health caregivers who have interests in providing cultural competent EOL care. There is a potential to alleviate health disparities of this specific cultural group.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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