2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147948
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Readability of Patient Education Information
Abstract:
The Readability of Patient Education Information
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Humphrey, James P., RN, MSN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Valdosta State University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing/Coordinator of Nursing Research
The ability to read and understand patient education information is paramount if patients are to accurately participate in care and adhere to recommended regimens. An exploratory research design directed this study to determine if selected patient information materials (PIM) used in a five-hospital system in southern Georgia were written at the appropriate level to be read and understood by the target population. Six hundred and sixty four participants were studied as they presented to emergency departments of these hospitals. Five commonly used PIMs were analyzed for readability using the SMOG formula with a resultant mean grade reading level required of 13.0. Results were compared to the last grade completed by the sample, a mean level of 11.26. A statistically significant difference (p< 0.001) was found between the reading level of the patient education information and the last grade completed by the sample. Approximately 80% of the patients presenting to the selected emergency departments may have been unable to read and comprehend the materials based on the findings of the study. Studies have repeatedly shown that individuals read three to five grade levels below their last grade completed. If patients are to participate accurately in their care, providers of patient education information materials have a responsibility to develop and distribute readable materials written at appropriate grade levels for effective comprehension. As the problem of discrepancy between the readability of patient education information and the educational levels of the target population becomes more evident and documented, registered nurses should assume a leadership role in assessing the information they routinely develop and distribute to patients and their significant others to assure the best outcomes possible. To make patient education information materials effective communication tools, registered nurses must be proactive in assessing these tools and initiating appropriate changes to serve clients and populations successfully.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Readability of Patient Education Informationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147948-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Readability of Patient Education Information</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Humphrey, James P., RN, MSN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Valdosta State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing/Coordinator of Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">phumphre@caironet.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The ability to read and understand patient education information is paramount if patients are to accurately participate in care and adhere to recommended regimens. An exploratory research design directed this study to determine if selected patient information materials (PIM) used in a five-hospital system in southern Georgia were written at the appropriate level to be read and understood by the target population. Six hundred and sixty four participants were studied as they presented to emergency departments of these hospitals. Five commonly used PIMs were analyzed for readability using the SMOG formula with a resultant mean grade reading level required of 13.0. Results were compared to the last grade completed by the sample, a mean level of 11.26. A statistically significant difference (p&lt; 0.001) was found between the reading level of the patient education information and the last grade completed by the sample. Approximately 80% of the patients presenting to the selected emergency departments may have been unable to read and comprehend the materials based on the findings of the study. Studies have repeatedly shown that individuals read three to five grade levels below their last grade completed. If patients are to participate accurately in their care, providers of patient education information materials have a responsibility to develop and distribute readable materials written at appropriate grade levels for effective comprehension. As the problem of discrepancy between the readability of patient education information and the educational levels of the target population becomes more evident and documented, registered nurses should assume a leadership role in assessing the information they routinely develop and distribute to patients and their significant others to assure the best outcomes possible. To make patient education information materials effective communication tools, registered nurses must be proactive in assessing these tools and initiating appropriate changes to serve clients and populations successfully.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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