Nursing Documentation: Dominant and Suppressed Discourses Within Nursing Records

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147949
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Documentation: Dominant and Suppressed Discourses Within Nursing Records
Abstract:
Nursing Documentation: Dominant and Suppressed Discourses Within Nursing Records
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hyde, Abbey, RGN, BSocSc, MSocSc, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University College Dublin
Title:Dr.
Co-Authors:Margaret (Pearl) Treacy, PhD, MSc, BA, (Hons), RGN; P. Anne Scott, RGN, MSc, PhD; Padraig Mac Neela, PhD; Michelle Butler, PhD, MSc, BSc, RGN, RM; Jonathan Drennan, MEd, BSc, RGN, RPN, RNMH, RNT; Kate Irving, PhD, BSc, RGN
This paper is based on a discourse analysis of the nursing records of 45 patients and explores how nurses represented aspects of their practice within such records. The analysis suggests that the nursing documents analysed were dominated by biomedical components of care, with psychosocial elements receiving much less attention. That biomedicine dominates contemporary nursing practice has long been acknowledged among nursing leaders. However, we present explanatory insights for the preponderance of biotechnical aspects of care by drawing on the work of the German critical theorist, Jurgen Habermas. Habermas distinguishes between two components in society, the system and the lifeworld. The system depicts the realm of society associated with technical-scientific rationality, and is mediated by power and strategic action, and invokes a purposive rationality. The lifeworld, by contrast, represents a value-orientated rationality aimed at reaching understanding through communicative action. While Habermas (1984) accepted the need for purposive-rational action, he expressed concern about the expansion of technological and scientific expertise that served to undermine rules of conduct based on value-orientated ethical considerations. This he referred to as the colonisation of the lifeworld, where the system, with its purposive rationality, penetrates the lifeworld, inhibiting its communicative potential. In analyzing the documentation, we draw parallels between Habermas' notion of the colonization of the lifeworld by the system, in particular, because of the biocentric status of nursing records and the simultaneous suppression of ?the voice of nursing' in the texts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Documentation: Dominant and Suppressed Discourses Within Nursing Recordsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147949-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Documentation: Dominant and Suppressed Discourses Within Nursing Records</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hyde, Abbey, RGN, BSocSc, MSocSc, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University College Dublin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dr.</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">abbey.hyde@ucd.ie</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret (Pearl) Treacy, PhD, MSc, BA, (Hons), RGN; P. Anne Scott, RGN, MSc, PhD; Padraig Mac Neela, PhD; Michelle Butler, PhD, MSc, BSc, RGN, RM; Jonathan Drennan, MEd, BSc, RGN, RPN, RNMH, RNT; Kate Irving, PhD, BSc, RGN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This paper is based on a discourse analysis of the nursing records of 45 patients and explores how nurses represented aspects of their practice within such records. The analysis suggests that the nursing documents analysed were dominated by biomedical components of care, with psychosocial elements receiving much less attention. That biomedicine dominates contemporary nursing practice has long been acknowledged among nursing leaders. However, we present explanatory insights for the preponderance of biotechnical aspects of care by drawing on the work of the German critical theorist, Jurgen Habermas. Habermas distinguishes between two components in society, the system and the lifeworld. The system depicts the realm of society associated with technical-scientific rationality, and is mediated by power and strategic action, and invokes a purposive rationality. The lifeworld, by contrast, represents a value-orientated rationality aimed at reaching understanding through communicative action. While Habermas (1984) accepted the need for purposive-rational action, he expressed concern about the expansion of technological and scientific expertise that served to undermine rules of conduct based on value-orientated ethical considerations. This he referred to as the colonisation of the lifeworld, where the system, with its purposive rationality, penetrates the lifeworld, inhibiting its communicative potential. In analyzing the documentation, we draw parallels between Habermas' notion of the colonization of the lifeworld by the system, in particular, because of the biocentric status of nursing records and the simultaneous suppression of ?the voice of nursing' in the texts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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