The Effects of an Educational Intervention on Knowledge, Self-Efficacy and Perceived Risk of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147955
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of an Educational Intervention on Knowledge, Self-Efficacy and Perceived Risk of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women
Abstract:
The Effects of an Educational Intervention on Knowledge, Self-Efficacy and Perceived Risk of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Johnson-Mallard, Versie, MSN, WHNPc
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Florida
Title:Doctoral Student
The purpose of this research study was to test the effects of an education intervention on knowledge, perceived risk, and self-efficacy for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) prevention in women. Additionally, the instruments that measured knowledge of sexually transmitted infections and perceived risk were tested for reliability. Instruments used to test the effects of the intervention at pretest and following the intervention included the Sexually Transmitted Infection Knowledge Survey; the Perceived Risk for Sexually Transmitted Infection Survey; and the Sexual Self-Efficacy Survey (Heather & Pinkerton, 1998). Participants included 89-women seeking family planning services, STIs services or prenatal care at three county health units. Participants were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 47) or control (n = 42) group. The treatment group received the theory based STI education intervention. A logic model and Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory were used to test the effects of an education intervention. Significantly differences from pretest to posttest was obtained between the experimental and control group on knowledge of STIs F (1, 87) = 73.66, p
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of an Educational Intervention on Knowledge, Self-Efficacy and Perceived Risk of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147955-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of an Educational Intervention on Knowledge, Self-Efficacy and Perceived Risk of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson-Mallard, Versie, MSN, WHNPc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">clengach@hsc.usf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research study was to test the effects of an education intervention on knowledge, perceived risk, and self-efficacy for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) prevention in women. Additionally, the instruments that measured knowledge of sexually transmitted infections and perceived risk were tested for reliability. Instruments used to test the effects of the intervention at pretest and following the intervention included the Sexually Transmitted Infection Knowledge Survey; the Perceived Risk for Sexually Transmitted Infection Survey; and the Sexual Self-Efficacy Survey (Heather &amp; Pinkerton, 1998). Participants included 89-women seeking family planning services, STIs services or prenatal care at three county health units. Participants were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 47) or control (n = 42) group. The treatment group received the theory based STI education intervention. A logic model and Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory were used to test the effects of an education intervention. Significantly differences from pretest to posttest was obtained between the experimental and control group on knowledge of STIs F (1, 87) = 73.66, p</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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