Evaluating the Efficacy of a Behavior Modification Program in Overweight African American Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147969
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluating the Efficacy of a Behavior Modification Program in Overweight African American Adolescents
Abstract:
Evaluating the Efficacy of a Behavior Modification Program in Overweight African American Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lane-Tillerson, Crystal D., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Hampton University
Title:Medical Systems Analyst
Obesity tends to increase in African American females relative to their White American counterparts during adolescence. Despite the disparity in African American adolescent females, there are very few studies that have been attentive to interventions directed toward this group. This study is assessing the effectiveness of a nursing intervention that combines nutrition, physical activity, and group support for the purpose of assisting African American female adolescents to reach their personal weight loss goals. The efficacy of the 16-week program will be determined by comparing pre and post measures of weight, blood pressure, body mass index, and cholesterol level, as well as comparing scores on self-esteem, depression, and body image scales. Furthermore, this study is exploring outcome variations and will compare the efficacy of the intervention across two different group conditions characterized by different degrees of parental support. The study consists of 20 adolescent participants in the southeastern region of Virginia.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluating the Efficacy of a Behavior Modification Program in Overweight African American Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147969-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluating the Efficacy of a Behavior Modification Program in Overweight African American Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lane-Tillerson, Crystal D., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hampton University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Medical Systems Analyst</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ctillers@csc.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Obesity tends to increase in African American females relative to their White American counterparts during adolescence. Despite the disparity in African American adolescent females, there are very few studies that have been attentive to interventions directed toward this group. This study is assessing the effectiveness of a nursing intervention that combines nutrition, physical activity, and group support for the purpose of assisting African American female adolescents to reach their personal weight loss goals. The efficacy of the 16-week program will be determined by comparing pre and post measures of weight, blood pressure, body mass index, and cholesterol level, as well as comparing scores on self-esteem, depression, and body image scales. Furthermore, this study is exploring outcome variations and will compare the efficacy of the intervention across two different group conditions characterized by different degrees of parental support. The study consists of 20 adolescent participants in the southeastern region of Virginia.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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