Needs and Priorities in Nursing Ethics Education in Japan and Korea

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147974
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Needs and Priorities in Nursing Ethics Education in Japan and Korea
Abstract:
Needs and Priorities in Nursing Ethics Education in Japan and Korea
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Lee, Won-Hee, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Yonsei University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Megumi Teshima, RN, MN; Sue Kim, RN, PhD; Hyo-Suk Jeon, RN, MA
Purpose: This presentation aims to describe the state of nursing ethics education in two Asian countries and provide insights on their unique needs and priorities. Design: This descriptive survey used a structured questionnaire developed by the research team to identify the following: 1) issues in nursing ethics education (9 items), and 2) ethical clinical problems categorized in the areas of nursing staff, practice , profession, and coworkers (26 items) using a 5 point Likert scale to score the severity of the problems. Data collection: The questionnaire set was sent to deans and representatives from all nursing colleges in Japan and Korea, inviting them to participate in the survey. The data were collected within 2 weeks after the initial mailing (Japan n=57(31.7%), Korea n=52(45.6%)). Results: In Japan, 87.7% answered that nursing ethics was taught and 80.7% noted the need for training of ethics educators. In Korea 98.08% had a course on nursing ethics, but only 38.46% noted the need for training. The severity of ethical issues for nurses follows: In Japan, accepting responsibility for nursing care was the highest priority while equitable social and economic working conditions in nursing was the lowest. In Korea, confidentiality was the highest priority and the care of aging and chronically ill patients was the lowest. On the main nursing ethical problems, Japan identified a deficiency in nursing ethics education through the lack of nursing ethics educators. In contrast Korean respondents noted nurses' leadership in the physician-nurse relationship as first priority. The common main nursing ethical problem between the two countries was the lack of quality nursing ethics education. This study provides insights on the state of nursing ethics education in Asia the unique as well as common issues each country encounters. Findings suggest the need for partnerships in Asian nursing ethics.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNeeds and Priorities in Nursing Ethics Education in Japan and Koreaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147974-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Needs and Priorities in Nursing Ethics Education in Japan and Korea</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lee, Won-Hee, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yonsei University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leewhn508@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Megumi Teshima, RN, MN; Sue Kim, RN, PhD; Hyo-Suk Jeon, RN, MA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This presentation aims to describe the state of nursing ethics education in two Asian countries and provide insights on their unique needs and priorities. Design: This descriptive survey used a structured questionnaire developed by the research team to identify the following: 1) issues in nursing ethics education (9 items), and 2) ethical clinical problems categorized in the areas of nursing staff, practice , profession, and coworkers (26 items) using a 5 point Likert scale to score the severity of the problems. Data collection: The questionnaire set was sent to deans and representatives from all nursing colleges in Japan and Korea, inviting them to participate in the survey. The data were collected within 2 weeks after the initial mailing (Japan n=57(31.7%), Korea n=52(45.6%)). Results: In Japan, 87.7% answered that nursing ethics was taught and 80.7% noted the need for training of ethics educators. In Korea 98.08% had a course on nursing ethics, but only 38.46% noted the need for training. The severity of ethical issues for nurses follows: In Japan, accepting responsibility for nursing care was the highest priority while equitable social and economic working conditions in nursing was the lowest. In Korea, confidentiality was the highest priority and the care of aging and chronically ill patients was the lowest. On the main nursing ethical problems, Japan identified a deficiency in nursing ethics education through the lack of nursing ethics educators. In contrast Korean respondents noted nurses' leadership in the physician-nurse relationship as first priority. The common main nursing ethical problem between the two countries was the lack of quality nursing ethics education. This study provides insights on the state of nursing ethics education in Asia the unique as well as common issues each country encounters. Findings suggest the need for partnerships in Asian nursing ethics.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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