Application of the Symptom Management Model to the Day Surgery Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147983
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Application of the Symptom Management Model to the Day Surgery Population
Abstract:
Application of the Symptom Management Model to the Day Surgery Population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Mandzuk, Lynda L., RN, BN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Boniface General Hospital
Title:Continuing Education Instructor
The number and types of day surgery procedures continue to increase. In spite of this trend, little is known about day surgery patients' pain and quality of life after discharge. The purpose of this poster presentation is to apply the revised Symptom Management Model (Dodd et al., 2001) to the day surgery population. Although relatively new, the model is promising in its application to nursing practice as it uniquely focuses on the management of symptoms within three related symptom dimensions: symptom experience, symptom management strategies and outcomes. Each of these three dimensions as well as the domains of person, health/illness, and environment will be reviewed in detail. The poster presentation will illustrate the linkages between the model's three dimensions and pain, pain interventions, and quality of life. Methods to assess patients' pain and quality of life will also be identified. One of the model's many strengths is its emphasis on the patients' perceptions while one limitation could be the attention to non-adherence within the model. The practical application of this model is significant because not only will it add to our understanding of how day surgery patients manage after discharge, but it will also allow us to examine pain and quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplication of the Symptom Management Model to the Day Surgery Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147983-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Application of the Symptom Management Model to the Day Surgery Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mandzuk, Lynda L., RN, BN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Boniface General Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Continuing Education Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lmandzuk@sbgh.mb.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The number and types of day surgery procedures continue to increase. In spite of this trend, little is known about day surgery patients' pain and quality of life after discharge. The purpose of this poster presentation is to apply the revised Symptom Management Model (Dodd et al., 2001) to the day surgery population. Although relatively new, the model is promising in its application to nursing practice as it uniquely focuses on the management of symptoms within three related symptom dimensions: symptom experience, symptom management strategies and outcomes. Each of these three dimensions as well as the domains of person, health/illness, and environment will be reviewed in detail. The poster presentation will illustrate the linkages between the model's three dimensions and pain, pain interventions, and quality of life. Methods to assess patients' pain and quality of life will also be identified. One of the model's many strengths is its emphasis on the patients' perceptions while one limitation could be the attention to non-adherence within the model. The practical application of this model is significant because not only will it add to our understanding of how day surgery patients manage after discharge, but it will also allow us to examine pain and quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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