Impact of Chronic Illness on Children and the Role of Companion Animals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/147990
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Chronic Illness on Children and the Role of Companion Animals
Abstract:
Impact of Chronic Illness on Children and the Role of Companion Animals
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:McClaskey, Barbara R., PhD, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:Pittsburg State University
Title:Associate Professor
This study of school-age children used a descriptive, correlational design and self-report questionnaires completed by children and parents for the purpose of examining the impact of chronic illness and identifying factors that may be associated with adaptation to the illness. The conceptual framework was based on Roy's theory of adaptation and Grey and Thurber's model of adaptation to childhood illness (diabetes). The sample included 78 children with a chronic illness and 156 children without a chronic illness. The child's self-concept, competence, and problem behavior scores were the dependent variables. The independent variables included residual stimuli of age, gender, and socioeconomic status and contextual stimuli of severity of illness, family cohesion, and pet ownership. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the only significant variable associated with self-concept in the total group was pet ownership with pet owners having higher self-concept. In regards to competence, those children without chronic illness, with higher income, and pet owners had higher scores. Children with chronic illness, with lower income, and with lower family cohesion had higher problem behavior scores. In addition to examining the influences on the total group, the illness and the no illness groups were compared. Pet ownership was positively associated with self-concept in the illness group, but not in the no illness group. However, pet ownership was a positive factor for both groups in relation to child competence. In the illness group, if the child was affected more days by the illness, the child had lower competence and higher problem behavior scores. Higher self-concept, higher competence, and lower problem behavior may reflect adaptation to chronic illness. It is essential for nursing to promote healthy psychological adjustment in maintaining quality of life as one lives with the stress of illness. For some children one positive factor may be the presence of a pet.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Chronic Illness on Children and the Role of Companion Animalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/147990-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Chronic Illness on Children and the Role of Companion Animals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McClaskey, Barbara R., PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Pittsburg State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bmcclask@pittstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study of school-age children used a descriptive, correlational design and self-report questionnaires completed by children and parents for the purpose of examining the impact of chronic illness and identifying factors that may be associated with adaptation to the illness. The conceptual framework was based on Roy's theory of adaptation and Grey and Thurber's model of adaptation to childhood illness (diabetes). The sample included 78 children with a chronic illness and 156 children without a chronic illness. The child's self-concept, competence, and problem behavior scores were the dependent variables. The independent variables included residual stimuli of age, gender, and socioeconomic status and contextual stimuli of severity of illness, family cohesion, and pet ownership. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the only significant variable associated with self-concept in the total group was pet ownership with pet owners having higher self-concept. In regards to competence, those children without chronic illness, with higher income, and pet owners had higher scores. Children with chronic illness, with lower income, and with lower family cohesion had higher problem behavior scores. In addition to examining the influences on the total group, the illness and the no illness groups were compared. Pet ownership was positively associated with self-concept in the illness group, but not in the no illness group. However, pet ownership was a positive factor for both groups in relation to child competence. In the illness group, if the child was affected more days by the illness, the child had lower competence and higher problem behavior scores. Higher self-concept, higher competence, and lower problem behavior may reflect adaptation to chronic illness. It is essential for nursing to promote healthy psychological adjustment in maintaining quality of life as one lives with the stress of illness. For some children one positive factor may be the presence of a pet.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:38:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:38:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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