Nurse Motivation, Cognitive Style and Perceptions of Safety Culture in Medical Surgical Units: Evidence Toward the Development of a Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148006
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Motivation, Cognitive Style and Perceptions of Safety Culture in Medical Surgical Units: Evidence Toward the Development of a Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery Model
Abstract:
Nurse Motivation, Cognitive Style and Perceptions of Safety Culture in Medical Surgical Units: Evidence Toward the Development of a Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery Model
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Moody, Roseanne C., RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University School of Nursing
Title:Graduate Teaching Associate
Co-Authors:Daniel J. Pesut, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN; Janet Bingle, RN, MS; Melodi Bauer, RN, BSN; Eleanore Wilson, MA, BSN, RN; Rhea Oliver, BSN, RN, BC; Carla Smith, RN; Mary Browning, MS, RN, CRRN; Patti Eisenberg, MSN, APRN, BC; Charles F. Harrington, PhD
This research reports on relationships among five variables within a model of Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery (HPQNCD) (Moody & Pesut). The factors that were explored in this research were: motivational and cognitive decision making styles of nurses, perceptions of safety culture in relation to productivity and reported medication errors on medical surgical units in two hospitals within a health system. Empirically derived models of nurses' work that incorporate nurse performance factors in relation to patient outcomes, cost, quality and productivity are needed Method: A 109 item, cross-sectional, safety culture and nurse performance styles survey was created by combining three operational measures: 1) Kirton Adaptation-Innovation Inventory ? cognitive decision-making 2) Behavioral Activation-Inhibition Scales ?behavioral motivation and 3) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety ?safety culture. Nursing unit productivity and nurses' reported medication errors were used as dependent measures. Unit productivity in this study was defined as nursing care hours per patient day. Completing the survey were 158/186 staff nurses from two acute care hospitals in a metropolitan health care system (85% response rate). Results: Multiple regression and path analysis provide evidence that nurses' cognitive decision-making style is significantly correlated to behavioral motivation (activation [r=.236, p=.003] and inhibition [r=-.272, p=.001]). Behavioral inhibition is significantly correlated across multiple dimensions of nursing unit safety culture and frequency of medication error reporting. Conclusions: When creating nursing unit safety culture, nurses' intrapersonal cognitive and motivational styles are important nursing management and leadership considerations in service of achieving safe, high quality patient care. Implications: The Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery model and evidence derived from the testing of the model helps explain the role of both system and human performance factors that contribute to patient safety in hospital contexts.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Motivation, Cognitive Style and Perceptions of Safety Culture in Medical Surgical Units: Evidence Toward the Development of a Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148006-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurse Motivation, Cognitive Style and Perceptions of Safety Culture in Medical Surgical Units: Evidence Toward the Development of a Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moody, Roseanne C., RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Teaching Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rfmoody@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Daniel J. Pesut, PhD, APRN, BC, FAAN; Janet Bingle, RN, MS; Melodi Bauer, RN, BSN; Eleanore Wilson, MA, BSN, RN; Rhea Oliver, BSN, RN, BC; Carla Smith, RN; Mary Browning, MS, RN, CRRN; Patti Eisenberg, MSN, APRN, BC; Charles F. Harrington, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This research reports on relationships among five variables within a model of Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery (HPQNCD) (Moody &amp; Pesut). The factors that were explored in this research were: motivational and cognitive decision making styles of nurses, perceptions of safety culture in relation to productivity and reported medication errors on medical surgical units in two hospitals within a health system. Empirically derived models of nurses' work that incorporate nurse performance factors in relation to patient outcomes, cost, quality and productivity are needed Method: A 109 item, cross-sectional, safety culture and nurse performance styles survey was created by combining three operational measures: 1) Kirton Adaptation-Innovation Inventory ? cognitive decision-making 2) Behavioral Activation-Inhibition Scales ?behavioral motivation and 3) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety ?safety culture. Nursing unit productivity and nurses' reported medication errors were used as dependent measures. Unit productivity in this study was defined as nursing care hours per patient day. Completing the survey were 158/186 staff nurses from two acute care hospitals in a metropolitan health care system (85% response rate). Results: Multiple regression and path analysis provide evidence that nurses' cognitive decision-making style is significantly correlated to behavioral motivation (activation [r=.236, p=.003] and inhibition [r=-.272, p=.001]). Behavioral inhibition is significantly correlated across multiple dimensions of nursing unit safety culture and frequency of medication error reporting. Conclusions: When creating nursing unit safety culture, nurses' intrapersonal cognitive and motivational styles are important nursing management and leadership considerations in service of achieving safe, high quality patient care. Implications: The Human Performance Quality Nursing Care Delivery model and evidence derived from the testing of the model helps explain the role of both system and human performance factors that contribute to patient safety in hospital contexts.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.