2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148012
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Failure to Rescue to Improve Quality of Care
Abstract:
Using Failure to Rescue to Improve Quality of Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:O'Brien, Karen Sheffield, RN, MSN, ACNP-BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Medical Branch
Title:Nurse Practitioner and PhD student
The monetary issues in healthcare including funding shortages for many programs and cuts in hospital budgets has lead to many challenges and changes health care delivery today. Since nursing makes up a large part of most hospital budgets, these caregivers are often first to be downsized (Gordon, 2000). Understaffing is a constant battle, raising cost more as hospital's offer incentives for staff retention (Price, 2002). Increasing patient acuity adds to the nurses' frustrations when staffing levels are not increased to match. Lack of experienced nurses places a larger responsibility on more experienced staff. Unfortunately, these problems can add up to one devastating fact: Decrease in the quality of patient care and safety. Not surprisingly, the decrease in quality care and increase in adverse events has a price tag: almost $50 billion each year (Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 2000). Failure to rescue (FR), a term first found in medical literature in the early 1990's, has been only recently applied to nursing situations (Clarke & Aiken, 2004). Failure to rescue has been used as an outcome measure for hospital, nursing, and medical research, most gathering data from discharge documents. The first publication with FR as an outcome variable was the 1992 study by Silber, Williams, Krakauer, and Schwartz which identified characteristics of post-operative mortality. The National Quality Forum (NQF) which provides a framework for evaluating nursing care listed failure to rescue first in a group of 15 nurse sensitive performance measures (2004). FR could be utilized globally, at the unit level, or with an individual nurse to identify areas for improvement, including hospital systems and patient care models, continuing education programs, and optimum staffing matrixes. Discussion of FR scenarios should increase nurses' ability to recognize the ?weak signals,? allowing for intervention before a manageable complication progresses to failure to rescue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Failure to Rescue to Improve Quality of Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148012-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Failure to Rescue to Improve Quality of Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Brien, Karen Sheffield, RN, MSN, ACNP-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Medical Branch</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner and PhD student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">klobrien@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The monetary issues in healthcare including funding shortages for many programs and cuts in hospital budgets has lead to many challenges and changes health care delivery today. Since nursing makes up a large part of most hospital budgets, these caregivers are often first to be downsized (Gordon, 2000). Understaffing is a constant battle, raising cost more as hospital's offer incentives for staff retention (Price, 2002). Increasing patient acuity adds to the nurses' frustrations when staffing levels are not increased to match. Lack of experienced nurses places a larger responsibility on more experienced staff. Unfortunately, these problems can add up to one devastating fact: Decrease in the quality of patient care and safety. Not surprisingly, the decrease in quality care and increase in adverse events has a price tag: almost $50 billion each year (Kohn, Corrigan, &amp; Donaldson, 2000). Failure to rescue (FR), a term first found in medical literature in the early 1990's, has been only recently applied to nursing situations (Clarke &amp; Aiken, 2004). Failure to rescue has been used as an outcome measure for hospital, nursing, and medical research, most gathering data from discharge documents. The first publication with FR as an outcome variable was the 1992 study by Silber, Williams, Krakauer, and Schwartz which identified characteristics of post-operative mortality. The National Quality Forum (NQF) which provides a framework for evaluating nursing care listed failure to rescue first in a group of 15 nurse sensitive performance measures (2004). FR could be utilized globally, at the unit level, or with an individual nurse to identify areas for improvement, including hospital systems and patient care models, continuing education programs, and optimum staffing matrixes. Discussion of FR scenarios should increase nurses' ability to recognize the ?weak signals,? allowing for intervention before a manageable complication progresses to failure to rescue.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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