Engulfment in Three Distinct Chronic Illness Populations: Theoretical and Research Perspectives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148014
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Engulfment in Three Distinct Chronic Illness Populations: Theoretical and Research Perspectives
Abstract:
Engulfment in Three Distinct Chronic Illness Populations: Theoretical and Research Perspectives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:McCay, Elizabeth, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Ryerson University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Heather Beanlands, RN, PhD
Objective: Engulfment describes the process by which identity is lost, leaving individuals to consider themselves as only exemplars of a particular illness. This paper will present the engulfment framework and research findings from three clinical populations (schizophrenia; renal disease & bone marrow transplantation, BMT). Design: The results of three cross-sectional studies in schizophrenia; renal disease & BMT populations will be presented. Population, Sampling, Setting: Schizophrenia: 45 subjects were recruited from the First Episode Schizophrenia Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. Renal: 200 subjects were recruited from three University teaching hospitals. BMT: 90 subjects receiving allogenic BMT for a haematologic malignancy were recruited from Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. Methods (Concept or Variables Studied Together): All three studies have employed the Modified Engulfment Scale (MES) to gather self-concept data, and have measured related variables, such as symptoms, depression & quality of life enabling comparisons across all three clinical populations. Findings: Schizophrenia: The findings demonstrate significant correlations between self-concept (TSCS-personal) and the MES and quality of life. Renal: MES scores were positively correlated with course of illness, symptoms, illness intrusiveness and depression. BMT: MES scores correlated in a meaningful way with hopelessness, depression, self-esteem, symptoms, illness intrusiveness and intrusive thoughts related to the illness. The findings will be illustrated with qualitative quotes from all clinical groups. Conclusions: The collective results indicate that engulfment provides a useful perspective for understanding the impact of chronic illness on the self-concept. Results provide evidence of the reliability and validity for the MES across all three populations. Implications: The research findings support the theoretical assertion that engulfment is closely affiliated with increased psychosocial and emotional distress, as well as decreased life satisfaction. Chronic illness exerts a profound effect on the experience of the self and thus on psychological adjustment and ultimately quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEngulfment in Three Distinct Chronic Illness Populations: Theoretical and Research Perspectivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148014-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Engulfment in Three Distinct Chronic Illness Populations: Theoretical and Research Perspectives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCay, Elizabeth, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ryerson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bmccay@ryerson.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Heather Beanlands, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Engulfment describes the process by which identity is lost, leaving individuals to consider themselves as only exemplars of a particular illness. This paper will present the engulfment framework and research findings from three clinical populations (schizophrenia; renal disease &amp; bone marrow transplantation, BMT). Design: The results of three cross-sectional studies in schizophrenia; renal disease &amp; BMT populations will be presented. Population, Sampling, Setting: Schizophrenia: 45 subjects were recruited from the First Episode Schizophrenia Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. Renal: 200 subjects were recruited from three University teaching hospitals. BMT: 90 subjects receiving allogenic BMT for a haematologic malignancy were recruited from Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. Methods (Concept or Variables Studied Together): All three studies have employed the Modified Engulfment Scale (MES) to gather self-concept data, and have measured related variables, such as symptoms, depression &amp; quality of life enabling comparisons across all three clinical populations. Findings: Schizophrenia: The findings demonstrate significant correlations between self-concept (TSCS-personal) and the MES and quality of life. Renal: MES scores were positively correlated with course of illness, symptoms, illness intrusiveness and depression. BMT: MES scores correlated in a meaningful way with hopelessness, depression, self-esteem, symptoms, illness intrusiveness and intrusive thoughts related to the illness. The findings will be illustrated with qualitative quotes from all clinical groups. Conclusions: The collective results indicate that engulfment provides a useful perspective for understanding the impact of chronic illness on the self-concept. Results provide evidence of the reliability and validity for the MES across all three populations. Implications: The research findings support the theoretical assertion that engulfment is closely affiliated with increased psychosocial and emotional distress, as well as decreased life satisfaction. Chronic illness exerts a profound effect on the experience of the self and thus on psychological adjustment and ultimately quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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