2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148015
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leadership, Span of Control, and Performance
Abstract:
Leadership, Span of Control, and Performance
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:McCutcheon, Amelia, RN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Co-Authors:Diane Doran, PhD
This presentation will: 1) describe the influence of the manager's leadership style on nurse and patient outcomes; and 2) identify the leadership style that contributes to optimum nurse and patient outcomes under differing spans of control. The study used a descriptive-correlational design. The sample consisted of nurse managers, their unit nursing staff and patients, drawn from several hospitals, and four types of nursing units: Medical, Surgical, Obstetrics and Day Surgery. The study conceptual model linked concepts from three theories: span of control theory, transformational leadership theory, and contingency theory of leadership. The following measures were used: Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire Form 5X Revised (Bass & Avolio, 2000); a section from the Patient Judgments of Hospital Quality Questionnaire (Rubin et al., 1990); and McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale (Mueller & McCloskey, 1990). Data was analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. The span of control of the 41 managers ranged from 36-258, with an average of 81. Of the 720 nurses, 128 (18%) chose “not at all” or “maybe” when asked their intent to stay; and 525 (73%) have only been in nursing for less than 10 years. The top job aspect that nurses gave the highest average satisfaction score was “nursing peers”. Patients (n=683) gave “Courtesy and caring by nurses” and “Overall quality of nursing care” the highest average scores. The correlations between the study variables will be presented. Increasing our knowledge of how differing levels of span of control affect staff and managers has implications for policy development regarding the number of staff a nurse manager can effectively manage. In addition, empirical evidence identifying the particular leadership style that produces optimal performance in differing levels of span of control would help nurse leaders perform effectively, and positively influence nurse and patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeadership, Span of Control, and Performanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148015-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Leadership, Span of Control, and Performance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCutcheon, Amelia, RN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amy.mccutcheon@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Diane Doran, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This presentation will: 1) describe the influence of the manager's leadership style on nurse and patient outcomes; and 2) identify the leadership style that contributes to optimum nurse and patient outcomes under differing spans of control. The study used a descriptive-correlational design. The sample consisted of nurse managers, their unit nursing staff and patients, drawn from several hospitals, and four types of nursing units: Medical, Surgical, Obstetrics and Day Surgery. The study conceptual model linked concepts from three theories: span of control theory, transformational leadership theory, and contingency theory of leadership. The following measures were used: Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire Form 5X Revised (Bass &amp; Avolio, 2000); a section from the Patient Judgments of Hospital Quality Questionnaire (Rubin et al., 1990); and McCloskey-Mueller Satisfaction Scale (Mueller &amp; McCloskey, 1990). Data was analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling. The span of control of the 41 managers ranged from 36-258, with an average of 81. Of the 720 nurses, 128 (18%) chose &ldquo;not at all&rdquo; or &ldquo;maybe&rdquo; when asked their intent to stay; and 525 (73%) have only been in nursing for less than 10 years. The top job aspect that nurses gave the highest average satisfaction score was &ldquo;nursing peers&rdquo;. Patients (n=683) gave &ldquo;Courtesy and caring by nurses&rdquo; and &ldquo;Overall quality of nursing care&rdquo; the highest average scores. The correlations between the study variables will be presented. Increasing our knowledge of how differing levels of span of control affect staff and managers has implications for policy development regarding the number of staff a nurse manager can effectively manage. In addition, empirical evidence identifying the particular leadership style that produces optimal performance in differing levels of span of control would help nurse leaders perform effectively, and positively influence nurse and patient outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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