2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148016
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assisting Older Adults to Communicate Their Pain After Surgery
Abstract:
Assisting Older Adults to Communicate Their Pain After Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:McDonald, Deborah Dillon, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Connecticut
Title:associate professor
Co-Authors:Glenda Thomas, APRN, ONC; Karen Livingston, ONP, MS; Judith Severson, RN, BS
Objective: To assess the pain relief effect of an intervention assisting elders' to communicate their pain. Sample, Design & Setting: A posttest-only two-group experiment was used with repeated measures on postoperative day one and two, and one and seven days after hospital discharge. Forty preoperative elders were randomly assigned to either a control group where elders watched a 10-minute videotape on managing postoperative pain or a treatment group where elders watched a 15-minute videotape on managing postoperative pain and communicating pain management needs. Methods: A research assistant measured elders' pain using the Brief Pain Inventory. Measures included pain intensity; pain interference with walking, mood and sleep; and pain relief. Findings: Both groups reported moderate pain intensity during postoperative day one and two. Treatment group elders reported less pain interference with sleep postoperative day one, M = 3.6 (SD = 2.64) compared to control group elders M = 6.4 (SD = 3.46), F(1,38) = 8.39, p Conclusion: The pain communication intervention had modest, but significant effects on reducing pain interference with sleep during the early postoperative period. Implications: More effective pain relief might be achieved by educating both patients and providers about pain management and pain communication.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssisting Older Adults to Communicate Their Pain After Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148016-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assisting Older Adults to Communicate Their Pain After Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McDonald, Deborah Dillon, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Connecticut</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">associate professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">deborah.mcdonald@uconn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Glenda Thomas, APRN, ONC; Karen Livingston, ONP, MS; Judith Severson, RN, BS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To assess the pain relief effect of an intervention assisting elders' to communicate their pain. Sample, Design &amp; Setting: A posttest-only two-group experiment was used with repeated measures on postoperative day one and two, and one and seven days after hospital discharge. Forty preoperative elders were randomly assigned to either a control group where elders watched a 10-minute videotape on managing postoperative pain or a treatment group where elders watched a 15-minute videotape on managing postoperative pain and communicating pain management needs. Methods: A research assistant measured elders' pain using the Brief Pain Inventory. Measures included pain intensity; pain interference with walking, mood and sleep; and pain relief. Findings: Both groups reported moderate pain intensity during postoperative day one and two. Treatment group elders reported less pain interference with sleep postoperative day one, M = 3.6 (SD = 2.64) compared to control group elders M = 6.4 (SD = 3.46), F(1,38) = 8.39, p Conclusion: The pain communication intervention had modest, but significant effects on reducing pain interference with sleep during the early postoperative period. Implications: More effective pain relief might be achieved by educating both patients and providers about pain management and pain communication.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.