Nurses' Perspectives on the Ethical Issues They Face in Bone Marrow Transplant Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148019
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perspectives on the Ethical Issues They Face in Bone Marrow Transplant Nursing
Abstract:
Nurses' Perspectives on the Ethical Issues They Face in Bone Marrow Transplant Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:McLean, Leslie, BA, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:Capital Health
Title:Project Manager
Objective The purpose of this research was to render a detailed description of individual nurses ethical perspectives on nursing patients undergoing a bone marrow transplant. Design The study was conducted using the research method of interpretive phenomenology. Population, Sample, Setting Participants were accrued through the bone marrow transplant unit of a large adult tertiary care teaching hospital in Eastern Canada. Seven female nurses between the ages of 25-50 years and with 6-15 years of bone marrow transplant nursing participated. Methods Participants were asked through one-on-one interviews to describe situations in which they felt they were faced with an ethical/moral question or problem. The data analysis followed a framework of interpretive phenomenology as outlined by Benner (1994). Findings The nurses described a variety of situational constraints embedded in the hospital environment that influenced their ability to act in a manner consistent with their moral values. The sense of being constrained from enacting their moral agency generated a variety of negative emotions within the nurses. In the absence of mechanisms to help address the situations and/or manage the feelings that the situations evoked, it is evident from their stories that the moral anguish nurses experience is likely compromising patient care, the civility of the work environment, and is contributing to rates of nurse burnout. Implications This study has implications for nursing practice, education and research. The written description can assist in generating thought and ongoing dialogue on this topic and can be used to augment the study of formal ethical principles and theories with the added benefit of ensuring the nurses’ taken-for-granted moral or ethical insights and meanings will not be lost. This research also provides the basis for further investigations into the contextual factors that influence nurses’ moral practice and the long-term consequences of unresolved moral anguish.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perspectives on the Ethical Issues They Face in Bone Marrow Transplant Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148019-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Perspectives on the Ethical Issues They Face in Bone Marrow Transplant Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McLean, Leslie, BA, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Capital Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Project Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">leslie.mclean@cdha.nshealth.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective The purpose of this research was to render a detailed description of individual nurses ethical perspectives on nursing patients undergoing a bone marrow transplant. Design The study was conducted using the research method of interpretive phenomenology. Population, Sample, Setting Participants were accrued through the bone marrow transplant unit of a large adult tertiary care teaching hospital in Eastern Canada. Seven female nurses between the ages of 25-50 years and with 6-15 years of bone marrow transplant nursing participated. Methods Participants were asked through one-on-one interviews to describe situations in which they felt they were faced with an ethical/moral question or problem. The data analysis followed a framework of interpretive phenomenology as outlined by Benner (1994). Findings The nurses described a variety of situational constraints embedded in the hospital environment that influenced their ability to act in a manner consistent with their moral values. The sense of being constrained from enacting their moral agency generated a variety of negative emotions within the nurses. In the absence of mechanisms to help address the situations and/or manage the feelings that the situations evoked, it is evident from their stories that the moral anguish nurses experience is likely compromising patient care, the civility of the work environment, and is contributing to rates of nurse burnout. Implications This study has implications for nursing practice, education and research. The written description can assist in generating thought and ongoing dialogue on this topic and can be used to augment the study of formal ethical principles and theories with the added benefit of ensuring the nurses&rsquo; taken-for-granted moral or ethical insights and meanings will not be lost. This research also provides the basis for further investigations into the contextual factors that influence nurses&rsquo; moral practice and the long-term consequences of unresolved moral anguish.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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