A Biased Perspective: Using Bias to Facilitate Qualitative Inquiry

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/148027
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Biased Perspective: Using Bias to Facilitate Qualitative Inquiry
Abstract:
A Biased Perspective: Using Bias to Facilitate Qualitative Inquiry
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Author:Morse, Janice M., RN, Phd, (Anthro), PhD, (Nurs)
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Director, IIQM, Professor, Faculty of Nursing
Co-Authors:Judith A. Spiers, RN, PhD; Karin Olson, RN, PhD
Objective: In this presentation, I argue that bias is essential for conducting excellent qualitative inquiry. Rather than avoiding bias, qualitative researchers must use bias by deliberately maximizing the phenomena, the event or the instance they are exploring. Rationale: Quantitative techniques of randomization and selecting the average or typical example (rather than the extreme), makes it difficult in qualitative research to identify characteristics and to decontextualize concepts. Consistent with the principles of science, a pure substance renders insight into the composition of substances more quickly than contaminated samples. Such is the case for the discovery of the characteristics of concepts using the best, rather than an average example as data. Further, randomization increases the amount of data collected about common events, and provides inadequate data for saturation on the less common events, hence works to invalidate inquiry. Methods: Principles for maximizing bias that will be discussed include: purposively directed sampling, representative of the phenomena, rather that the population, so that the results contribute effectively and efficiently towards understanding. Further, techniques of abduction, verification and saturation to prevent error, misinterpretation and distortion of the results. I also will discuss the consequences and costs of attempting to avoid bias, and the pitfalls of biasphobia. Conclusions: The use of bias is essential for “good” qualitative inquiry, for obtaining results are to move beyond the obvious. A lack of understanding of qualitative principles, fear of discovery, or adherence to the principles of quantitative inquiry, are inhibitors to qualitative inquiry.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Biased Perspective: Using Bias to Facilitate Qualitative Inquiryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/148027-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Biased Perspective: Using Bias to Facilitate Qualitative Inquiry</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Morse, Janice M., RN, Phd, (Anthro), PhD, (Nurs)</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, IIQM, Professor, Faculty of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jan.morse@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Spiers, RN, PhD; Karin Olson, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: In this presentation, I argue that bias is essential for conducting excellent qualitative inquiry. Rather than avoiding bias, qualitative researchers must use bias by deliberately maximizing the phenomena, the event or the instance they are exploring. Rationale: Quantitative techniques of randomization and selecting the average or typical example (rather than the extreme), makes it difficult in qualitative research to identify characteristics and to decontextualize concepts. Consistent with the principles of science, a pure substance renders insight into the composition of substances more quickly than contaminated samples. Such is the case for the discovery of the characteristics of concepts using the best, rather than an average example as data. Further, randomization increases the amount of data collected about common events, and provides inadequate data for saturation on the less common events, hence works to invalidate inquiry. Methods: Principles for maximizing bias that will be discussed include: purposively directed sampling, representative of the phenomena, rather that the population, so that the results contribute effectively and efficiently towards understanding. Further, techniques of abduction, verification and saturation to prevent error, misinterpretation and distortion of the results. I also will discuss the consequences and costs of attempting to avoid bias, and the pitfalls of biasphobia. Conclusions: The use of bias is essential for &ldquo;good&rdquo; qualitative inquiry, for obtaining results are to move beyond the obvious. A lack of understanding of qualitative principles, fear of discovery, or adherence to the principles of quantitative inquiry, are inhibitors to qualitative inquiry.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T09:39:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T09:39:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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